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Re: [aroid-l] Araceae seed sowing & germination

  • Subject: Re: [aroid-l] Araceae seed sowing & germination
  • From: "Peter Boyce" <peterboyce@myjaring.net>
  • Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 11:56:55 +0800

Hi Chanrit

I've only tried to grown Pycnospatha arietina, and that only once from
freshly gathered seed while I was at Kew. I found germination to be slow
(6 - 10 weeks) but the plants grew OK. I sowed then on a 1:1 soil-less
compost: coarse sand mix, just covering the seed with the same. On
germination I allowed the seedlings to continue growing until crowded before
transplanting into separate pots. They grew well (but slowly) and when I
left Kew were doing well but still had not flowered. You might ask Wilbert
(who also got some of that seed from me) if his plants have flowered.

Pete

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Chanrit Sinhabaedya" <siamanthus@hotmail.com>
To: <aroid-l@lists.ncsu.edu>
Sent: Saturday, April 10, 2004 11:14 PM
Subject: Re: [aroid-l] Araceae seed sowing & germination


>
> How about Pycnospatha?
>
> I tried to germinate them a few times, but never successful.
>
> Do you have any tips?
>
>
> Thanks and regards,
>
> Chanrit Sinhabaedya
> Bangkok, Thailand.
>
>
> >From: "Peter Boyce" <peterboyce@myjaring.net>
> >Reply-To: aroid-l@lists.ncsu.edu
> >To: <aroid-l@lists.ncsu.edu>
> >Subject: [aroid-l] Araceae seed sowing & germination
> >Date: Fri, 9 Apr 2004 17:05:15 +0800
> >
> >Dea Folks
> >
> >As promised here are some aroid seed sowing notes for Alocasia,
> >Cyrtosperma,
> >Aglaonema and Colocasia. I'll put together some more for
Schismatoglottis,
> >Homalomena, Rhaphidophora, etc. as time allows. If anyone would like a
Word
> >or RTF version of these and any subsequent notes please email me at
> >
> >peterboyce@myjaring.net
> >
> >****************************
> >
> >Araceae seed sowing & germination
> >
> >General
> >Buying
> >If your import laws allow, all seed should be purchased inside the still
> >fleshy berry. Note that dried seed (in or out of the berry) will have a
low
> >to non-existent viability rate.
> >
> >Storage
> >Aroid seed stores poorly and dried seed will have a very low viability
> >arte.
> >For best results seed must be sown as fresh as possible. Seed viability
> >falls extremely quickly once the seed is cleaned of the berry pulp and so
> >the seed should remain in the berry until ready to sow. if seed must be
> >removed from the berry then it is vital that it remains damp but not wet.
> >Placing the seed in a folded, moistened kitchen towel (not toilet paper,
> >which breaks down when wet) inside a plastic bag kept in a cool room is a
> >good temporary storage medium.
> >
> >Alocasia
> >Cleaning
> >Alocasia seed is quite large (average black peppercorn size) and easy to
> >handle. Clean the seeds free of the berry pulp by gently squashing the
> >berries onto kitchen towel and separating the seeds of the pulp and any
> >seed
> >membrane. The seed membrane tightly adheres to the seed. Its presence is
> >detectable by the seed feeling slippery. Gently working the seed between
> >thumb and index finger will remove the membrane, after which the seed
will
> >feel very slightly rough. It is VITAL that this cleaning is done wearing
> >rubber or latex gloves - the fruit pulp is HIGHLY IRRITANT. Gently rinse
> >the
> >seed in a nylon sieve and dry on kitchen towel for a minute or two to
ease
> >handling.
> >
> >Sowing
> >Sow onto either:
> >1:1 ground sphagnum: Perlite, or
> >1:1 sieved coconut peat (coir): washed river sand, or
> >1:1 sieved coconut peat (coir): Perlite, or
> >1:1 propriety soil-less compost: Perlite
> >
> >Plastic pots or trays are better then clay (terracotta). The seed should
be
> >just covered with the same mix and then well watered and thereafter keep
> >damp and moderately shaded.
> >
> >Germination takes 2 - 3 weeks at a minimum of 21C (70F) and a max. of 29C
> >(84C).
> >
> >Germination & aftercare
> >Ideal conditions for germination are a heated greenhouse or in warm
> >climates
> >a shade house. If germinating indoors then choose a brightly lit BUT NOT
> >SUNNY windowsill and put the entire pot inside a polythene bag secured by
> >an
> >elastic band. Once germination is seen to be underway loosen the bag but
do
> >not remove. Allow the seedlings to develop the first leaf and then remove
> >the bag for a few hours a day to gradually acclimatize the seedlings;
after
> >a few days remove the bag entirely. Allow the seedlings to continue
growing
> >until a second leaf is seen emerging.
> >
> >Transplantation
> >At the second leaf emergence stage transplant into individual pots or, in
> >the case of a very large sowing, line out in large trays and allow to
grow
> >on. We transplant into:
> >
> >1:1:1 screened coconut peat (coir): washed river sand: crushed charcoal
> >(max
> >2 cm size)
> >
> >
> >Aglaonema
> >Cleaning
> >Aglaonema seed is large (average date stone size) and easy to handle.
Clean
> >the seeds free of the berry pulp by gently squashing the berries onto
> >kitchen towel and separating the seeds of the pulp and any seed membrane.
> >The seed membrane tightly adheres to the seed. Its presence is detectable
> >by
> >the seed feeling slippery. Gently working the seed between thumb and
index
> >finger will remove the membrane, after which the seed will feel very
> >slightly rough. Gently rinse the seed in a nylon sieve and dry on kitchen
> >towel for a minute or two to ease handling.
> >
> >Sowing
> >Sow onto either:
> >1:1 ground sphagnum: Perlite, or
> >1:1 sieved coconut peat (coir): washed river sand, or
> >1:1 sieved coconut peat (coir): Perlite, or
> >1:1 propriety soil-less compost: Perlite
> >
> >Plastic pots or trays are better then clay (terracotta). The seed should
be
> >covered to its own depth with the same mix and then well watered and
> >thereafter keep damp and moderately shaded.
> >
> >Germination takes 4 - 6 or more weeks at a minimum of 21C (70F) and a
max.
> >of 29C (84C).
> >
> >Germination & aftercare
> >Ideal conditions for germination are a heated greenhouse or in warm
> >climates
> >a shade house. If germinating indoors then choose a brightly lit BUT NOT
> >SUNNY windowsill and put the entire pot inside a polythene bag secured by
> >an
> >elastic band. Once germination is seen to be underway loosen the bag but
do
> >not remove. Allow the seedlings to develop the first leaf and then remove
> >the bag for a few hours a day to gradually acclimatize the seedlings;
after
> >a few days remove the bag entirely. Allow the seedlings to continue
growing
> >until a second leaf is seen emerging.
> >
> >Transplantation
> >Once the first leaf has expanded transplant into individual pots. We
> >transplant into:
> >
> >1:1:1 screened coconut peat (coir): washed river sand: crushed charcoal
> >(max. 2 cm size)
> >
> >
> >Amorphophallus
> >Cleaning
> >Amorphophallus seed is usually large (average black peppercorn to date
> >stone
> >size) and easy to handle. Clean the seeds free of the berry pulp by
gently
> >squashing the berries onto kitchen towel and separating the seeds of the
> >pulp and any seed membrane. The seed membrane tightly adheres to the
seed.
> >Its presence is detectable by the seed feeling slippery. Gently working
the
> >seed between thumb and index finger will remove the membrane, after which
> >the seed will feel very slightly rough. It is best that cleaning is done
> >wearing rubber or latex gloves - the fruit pulp can be quite irritating.
> >Gently rinse the seed in a nylon sieve and dry on kitchen towel for a
> >minute
> >or two to ease handling.
> >
> >Sowing
> >Sow onto either:
> >1:1 ground sphagnum: Perlite, or
> >1:1 sieved coconut peat (coir): washed river sand, or
> >1:1 sieved coconut peat (coir): Perlite, or
> >1:1 propriety soil-less compost: Perlite
> >
> >Plastic pots or trays are better then clay (terracotta). The seed should
be
> >covered to its own depth with the same mix and then well watered and
> >thereafter keep damp and moderately shaded.
> >
> >Germination takes 3 - 5 weeks at a minimum of 21C (70F) and a max. of 29C
> >(84C).
> >
> >Germination & aftercare
> >Ideal conditions for germination are a heated greenhouse or in warm
> >climates
> >a shade house. If germinating indoors then choose a brightly lit BUT NOT
> >SUNNY windowsill and put the entire pot inside a polythene bag secured by
> >an
> >elastic band. Once germination is seen to be underway loosen the bag but
do
> >not remove. Allow the seedlings to develop the first leaf and then remove
> >the bag for a few hours a day to gradually acclimatize the seedlings;
after
> >a few days remove the bag entirely. Allow the seedlings to continue
growing
> >until a second leaf is seen emerging.
> >
> >Transplantation
> >Once the leaf has expanded transplant into individual pots. We transplant
> >into:
> >
> >1:1:1 screened coconut peat (coir): washed river sand: crushed charcoal
> >(max. 2 cm size)
> >
> >
> >Colocasia
> >Cleaning
> >Colocasia seed is small (average 1 mm x 1.5 mm) and tricky to handle. The
> >main problem with cleaning is that inside each berry there are numerous
> >seeds embedded in very viscous gel which is difficult to remove. The
> >easiest
> >method is to put the berries into a plastic beaker full of water,
macerate
> >them with the fingers and then leave the beaker and its contents in a
warm,
> >shaded place for a week to ferment (it will smell pretty bad at the end
of
> >the time but the seed will come to no harm). After fermentation it will
be
> >found that the gel is very easily washed off by placing the entire beaker
> >contents into a fine nylon sieve under gently running water and working
the
> >seed/gel/pulp mass with the fingers. The gel will dissolve and the larger
> >pieces of berry, etc. may be removed by hand.
> >
> >Sowing
> >The cleaned seed is most easily sown by filling the beaker of seed with
> >fresh water, vigorously stirring with a finger and then pouring the
> >suspended seed and water onto the surface of the compost in a
pre-prepared
> >pot or tray; keep to beaker moving to ensure an even distribution of
seed.
> >
> >Sow onto either:
> >1:1 ground sphagnum: Perlite, or
> >1:1 sieved coconut peat (coir): Perlite, or
> >1:1 propriety soil-less compost: Perlite
> >
> >Plastic pots or trays are better then clay (terracotta). The seed should
> >not
> >be covered and must be kept damp and moderately shaded.
> >
> >Germination takes 1 - 2 weeks at a minimum of 21C (70F) and a max. of 29C
> >(84C).
> >
> >Germination & aftercare
> >Ideal conditions for germination are a heated greenhouse or in warm
> >climates
> >a shade house. If germinating indoors then choose a brightly lit BUT NOT
> >SUNNY windowsill and put the entire pot inside a polythene bag secured by
> >an
> >elastic band. Once germination is seen to be underway loosen the bag but
do
> >not remove. The first leaf is kidney shaped and at this stage the plants
> >are
> >very delicate and difficult to handle. The best transplantation method is
> >to
> >allow the clumps of seedlings to grow until they become congested and
then
> >to transplants small clumps of seedlings into individual pots. Colocasia
> >seedlings are very susceptible to fugal attack and it is recommended than
> >the transplanted seedlings are treated immediately with a suitable
> >fungicide
> >as prevention against damping off. DO NOT USE METALLIC COPPER FUNGICIDES
ON
> >ARACEAE - THEY ARE FATAL.
> >
> >Transplantation
> >At the second leaf emergence stage transplant into individual pots or, in
> >the case of a very large sowing, line out in large trays and allow to
grow
> >on. We transplant into:
> >
> >1:1 Screened coconut peat (coir): Perlite and water only from below until
> >individuals are large enough (5 - 7 leaves) for separation and repotting
> >into 1:1:1 screened coconut peat (coir): washed river sand: crushed
> >charcoal
> >(2 cm size) and thence treated as mature plants.
> >
> >
> >
> >Cyrtosperma
> >Cleaning
> >Cyrtosperma seed is large (average half peanut sized) and easy to handle.
> >However, cleaning seed is a problem since each berry contains several
> >numerous seeds embedded in very viscous gel which is difficult to remove.
> >Further, since the seeds are curved and variously ridges and warty the
gel
> >adheres strongly. The easiest method is to put the berries into a plastic
> >beaker full of water, macerate them with the fingers and then leave the
> >beaker and its contents in a warm, shaded place for a week to ferment (it
> >will smell pretty bad at the end of the time but the seed will come to no
> >harm). After fermentation it will be found that the gel is very easily
> >washed off by placing the entire beaker contents into a fine nylon sieve
> >under gently running water and working the seed/gel/pulp mass with the
> >fingers. The gel will dissolve and the larger pieces of berry, etc. may
be
> >removed by hand.
> >
> >Sowing
> >Sow onto either:
> >1:1 ground sphagnum: Perlite, or
> >1:1 sieved coconut peat (coir): Perlite, or
> >1:1 propriety soil-less compost: Perlite
> >
> >Plastic pots or trays are better then clay (terracotta). The seed should
be
> >covered to its own depth with the same mix and then well watered and
> >thereafter keep damp and moderately shaded.
> >
> >Germination takes 3 - 5 weeks at a minimum of 21C (70F) and a max. of 29C
> >(84C).
> >
> >Germination & aftercare
> >Ideal conditions for germination are a heated greenhouse or in warm
> >climates
> >a shade house. If germinating indoors then choose a brightly lit BUT NOT
> >SUNNY windowsill and put the entire pot inside a polythene bag secured by
> >an
> >elastic band. Once germination is seen to be underway loosen the bag but
do
> >not remove. Allow the seedlings to develop the first leaf and then remove
> >the bag for a few hours a day to gradually acclimatize the seedlings;
after
> >a few days remove the bag entirely. Allow the seedlings to continue
growing
> >until a second leaf is seen emerging.
> >
> >Transplantation
> >Once the leaf has expanded transplant into individual pots. We transplant
> >into:
> >
> >1:1:1 screened coconut peat (coir): washed river sand: crushed charcoal
> >(max. 2 cm size) and immediately stand the pots in shallow trays (c. 2 cm
> >deep) of water.
> >
> >
> >
>
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