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Re: Xanthosoma indica?

  • Subject: Re: Xanthosoma indica?
  • From: <ju-bo@msn.com>
  • Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2009 09:22:20 +0000

Dear John and Friends,

The illustration on this stamp, especially that of one leaf, does in fact closely resemble a non-discript species within the Neotropical genus Xanthosoma, but we MUST keep in mind that the artist might not have been a Botanist, and may have been using a generalized photo or illustration of an aroid (who knows!)  Since there are no blooms which would have assisted in determining  the precise I.D. of this plant, and there is no label on the stamp itself, Pete Boyce (perhaps in jest) suggested it might be "Xanthosoma indica'', a non-species if ever there was one!  But then again, to ramble on a little on this topic, there IS a named var./cultivar named "Alocasia amazonica'', a genus that does NOT occur naturally anywhere NEAR the Amazon Basin!  I did the research on this name, to discover that it was named by its creator (it is a hybrid) who owned a now-defunct nursery in the Miami area back in the 30`s-40`s and the Nursery`s name was "Amazon Nursery", hence the name of this Asian Plant.
 I came to the conclusion that the illustration on the stamp could very well be a sp. of Alocasia, which is native to that area while Xanthosoma is NOT.
Good Growing,

Julius


From: criswick@spiceisle.com
To: aroid-l@gizmoworks.com
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 05:50:31 -0700
Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Xanthosoma indica?

The plant has Xanthosoma written all over it, and aren’t all Xanthosomas tropical American?  The name X. indica therefore must be an impossibility.  John.

 


From: aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com [mailto:aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com] On Behalf Of ju-bo@msn.com
Sent: Monday, April 06, 2009 3:35 AM
To: aroid-l@gizmoworks.com
Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Xanthosoma indica?

 

Dear Marek,

Pete is most probably correct, stamps are VERY unreliable w/ their art-work, I`d like to see the stamp, can you send a photo to me please??

Julius


From: phymatarum@googlemail.com
To: aroid-l@gizmoworks.com
Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2009 06:33:09 +0800
Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Xanthosoma indica?

Hi Marek,

 

Bit styalized...my guess would be Xanthosoma rather than Alocasia...

 

Pete

 

From: aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com [mailto:aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com] On Behalf Of Marek Argent
Sent: 03 April 2009 08:23
To: discussion of aroids
Subject: [Aroid-l] Xanthosoma indica?

 

Hello,

 

I have a new stamp (see the attachment), the plant is named there Xanthosoma indica.

 

I think it is Alocasia indica or maybe A. macrorrhizos

What do you think?

 

Best,

Marek Argent

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