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A. konjac, invasive?

  • Subject: A. konjac, invasive?
  • From: "Alan Galloway" <alan_galloway@ncsu.edu>
  • Date: Wed, 1 Aug 2001 10:20:25 -0500 (CDT)

Donna,

The reproductive characteristics of A. konjac would certainly make one think
that
it could become invasive.  But I highly doubt that would/could happen here
in
Raleigh, NC, USDA zone 7.  There seems to be enough natural inhibitors to
thwart
A. konjac from becoming invasive.  From time to time, a natural fungal rot
attacks
my A. konjac collection.  This fungal rot seems to be a combination of
Phytothera,
Erwinia, and Southern Blight.  Some years it is worse than others.  And of
course
I have those nasty little critters called voles and chipmunks that seem
compelled
to bite into a tuber only to realize that it is too painful to eat, hence
leaving an
open wound to the tuber, eventually causing it to rot.

Some years, the adult tubers produce offsets abundantly, while other years
they
produce none.  And of course seed set is dependant upon the timing and the
number
of flowers produced in a season.

Given these factors, a colony of A. konjacs will only slowly grow in size.

You could always imagine  a colony of A. konjacs as a colony of Arisaema
triphyllums on steroids!

Alan
------------------------------------
Alan Galloway
Raleigh, North Carolina
------------------------------------






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