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Re: [aroid-l] Amorphophallus

  • Subject: Re: [aroid-l] Amorphophallus
  • From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter@worldonline.nl
  • Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2003 10:02:24 +0200
  • Importance: Normal

>
>   I must then ask this question----is there perhaps a var. or
> clone of A. bulbifer that produces a pleasant smelling
> bloom???   I know that Charile, here in WPB, used to or still
> grows plants that look to all intents and purposes like A.
> bulbifer, but produce a VERY beautiful flask-like bloom,
> peach/orange colored, and it emits a GOOD smell!   He had one
> in bloom for sale at a plant show at our local Bot. Garden
> about two or three years ago.   I shall  discuss this matter
> w/ Charlie, and perhaps try to obtain a plant!

I have to admit to not being confronted with too many clones of A. bulbifer
and it would be imaginable that there are "good" smelling ones. The chemical
composition of the plants we tested consists almost entirely of
dimethyltrisulphide (96%), 2% dimethyldisulphide and 1%
dimethyltetrasulphide. Now my experience is that species in which the
content of dimethyltetrasulphide is higher, a certain "sweetness" develops
but it is a very delicate balance with nauseaous. I also found that bad
smelling plants change their odour sometimes when the bloom ages and usually
also ends up "sweetish". My guess is that the amount of the tetrasulphide
relative to the other two sulphides determines this sweetness. There is
absolute variation in the tetrasulphide amount in certain species, so indeed
you may have clones in bulbifer with more sweetness. Having said all that, I
don't like the tetrasulphide sweetness at all. It is too close to nausea.

Well, I hope you learned you sulphides lesson here!!

Lord Phallulphides


>   Cheers,
>
>   Julius
>
>   >>The bloom is not unlike that of bulbifer, even to the
> point of having a
>   pinkish interior (and sometimes exterior, see the IAS
> website!!!) but a more
>   distinct constriction between base and limb. The smell is
> as horrid as
>   bulbifer and those who think it is "good smelling" probably
> originate from
>   Uranus................(no pun intended..........I think....).
>
>   Lord P<<
>
>
>   > -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
>   > Van: aroid-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
>   > [mailto:aroid-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu]Namens Julius Boos
>   > Verzonden: donderdag 31 juli 2003 7:58
>   > Aan: aroid-l@lists.ncsu.edu
>   > Onderwerp: Re: [aroid-l] Amorphophallus
>   >
>   >
>   >
>   >   ----- Original Message -----
>   >   From: Wilbert Hetterscheid
>   >   To: aroid-l@lists.ncsu.edu
>   >   Sent: Wednesday, July 30, 2003 11:25 PM
>   >   Subject: Re: [aroid-l] Amorphophallus
>   >
>   >
>   >   Dear Lord P,
>   >
>   >   Does not A. muelleri also produce a pleasant smelling,
>   > beautifully colored peach/orange bloom?   It used to be
>   > referred to around here as the 'good-smelling A. bulbifer'.
>   >
>   >   Julius
>   >   WPB,
>   >   FLORIDA
>   >
>   >   >>That could be Am. muelleri but there are also striped
>   > forms of bulbifer.
>   >
>   >   Wilbert<<
>   >
>   >
>   >   > -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
>   >   > Van: aroid-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
>   >   > [mailto:aroid-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu]Namens Lowell McCormick
>   >   > Verzonden: donderdag 31 juli 2003 2:46
>   >   > Aan: Blind.Copy.Receiver@compuserve.com
>   >   > Onderwerp: [aroid-l] Amorphophallus
>   >   >
>   >   >
>   >   > Howdy all,
>   >   >
>   >   > Last winter someone posted a message on the identity
> of an Amorpho
>   >   > that produces bulbils on the top of the leaf like A.
>   >   > bulbifer, but the stem
>   >   > is very dark green and light green  vertical streaks.  It
>   >   > also comes up
>   >   > later in the spring than A. bulbifer.  Can anyone tell me
>   >   > what this species
>   >   > is again?  It seems I wasn't smart enough to tag the
>   > plant or save the
>   >   > message.
>   >   >
>   >   > TIA,
>   >   >
>   >   > Mary
>   >   >
>   >   >
>   >   >   E-mail from: Lowell McCormick, 30-Jul-2003
>





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