hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Some More Thoughts on Aroideana/IAS Newsletter

  • Subject: Some More Thoughts on Aroideana/IAS Newsletter
  • From: Victor Soukup <soukupvg@email.uc.edu>
  • Date: Mon, 10 Dec 2007 11:05:48 -0500

to Members with various wants/needs.
	About 20 years ago after the seven independent wildflower societies in 
Ohio decided to get together to form a Ohio Native Plant Society, a first 
order of business was to decide on a publication to serve the various 
wants/needs of the group.  This was the birth of the short-lived journal 
"Trillium", Journal of the Ohio Native Plant Society.  The aspirations for 
what would appear were lofty.  It would carry scientific articles of 
various caliber and discussions of wildflower sites to visit,  and 
announcements of coming events of statewide importance.  Trillium was to be 
a quarterly periodical, but due to various problems soon was an annual.  It 
folded after three years because the only articles were those of the 
officers or editors.  No amount of pleading, including blackmail (ask me 
about details if interested) could drag articles out of would-be 
contributors.
	The situation with Aroideana is similar yet different in one important 
way.  Aroideana has become a primary journal in which research articles are 
published.  It has a certain standard to maintain.  For example, it serves 
as the publication site (one of the requirements of naming a new species) 
of many new Aroids.  Therefore it has a reputation to uphold.  The other 
articles, all with merit, are the icing on the cake, and cover many 
interesting and important aspects of our favorite family --- not just 
anyone's favorite genera.  I am hoping that my study on the acids of the 
seed lipids will be accepted when ready.
	The Newsletter, I think, serves its purpose adequately, sometimes 
brilliantly.  That is where news of events, ideas about cultivation, etc. 
should appear.
	How could we make things better?  Before we opt to publish Aroideana as a 
quarterly, let us remember what happens when you give a party and no one 
comes.  You have to have articles  waiting to be published and we know that 
the editor is regularly asking/begging for papers for the once a year 
format.  I'm sure everyone would be willing to an increase in dues of $10 - 
20 dollars  for a quarterly journal if it was of the same quality.  But you 
must have the articles!
	I am not advocating for change or for status quo  I just hope that 
everyone will take a good look at what we have before wanting to move on, 
and what they will be willing to contribute to make any new form a success.
	Been down that road,

Vic Soukup PhD
Herbarium
University of Cincinnati
Cincinnati, OH 45221-0006  

_______________________________________________
Aroid-L mailing list
Aroid-L@www.gizmoworks.com
http://www.gizmoworks.com/mailman/listinfo/aroid-l



Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index



 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement