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Re: [aroid-l] amorphophallus bulbs

  • Subject: Re: [aroid-l] amorphophallus bulbs
  • From: Paul Tyerman <ptyerman@ozemail.com.au>
  • Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2004 11:52:48 +1100

>few years noticed something fairly odd. In plants I kept out of the dirt 
>and bloomed did shrivel and shrink a lot as the energy was being used. 
>But in some I had bloom in the ground the bulb actually grew much larger 
>I did notice just a few roots but I was expecting a much smaller bulb 
>but then found it had grown a whole lot. I am not sure if it was active 

Howdy,

The ones in the ground would I assume be getting sunlight while the ones
out of the ground would be inside?  If so, the stem of the flower would be
photosynthesising as it is green or marbled in some form or other.  That'd
be producing some food at least wouldn't it?  Between that and nutrients
being drawn in via the roots I figure that would probably account for the
bulb being healthier planted than sitting about in the house? <grin>

That's sort of how it would work wouldn't it?

Cheers.

Paul Tyerman
Canberra, Australia.  USDA equivalent - Zone 8/9
mailto:ptyerman@ozemail.com.au

Growing.... Galanthus, Erythroniums, Fritillarias, Cyclamen, Crocus,
Cyrtanthus, Oxalis, Liliums, Hellebores, Aroids, Irises plus just about
anything else that doesn't move!!!!!



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