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Re: Growing arums in pots

  • Subject: Re: Growing arums in pots
  • From: "D. Christopher Rogers" <branchiopod@gmail.com>
  • Date: Mon, 6 Feb 2012 10:13:48 -0600

Thanks for the great review of the species in Arum.
 
One issue though, Peter: you said that there is no refereeing, just general acceptance. I have no real clue how things are done in the botanical realm, but in the zoological realm all species descriptions that are submitted to quality scientific white literature (as opposed to grey) type journals are in fact refereed. Typically, two to four referees give the manuscripts a solid review before they are  accepted (or rejected) for publication. There are certain standards of taxonomy in zoology.
 
Happy days,
Christopher

On Wed, Feb 1, 2012 at 1:30 AM, Peter Boyce <phymatarum@googlemail.com> wrote:

Hi David,

 

Yes, there have been a few changes since 1993 and even since 2006.

 

sintensii was ‘raised’ to spevcies in the 2006 paper; cylindraceum (which I treated as a nom. dub. in 1993) has been shown to be the same as A. alpinum and, as it was published earlier, now must be used.

 

Arum lucanum is a syn. of A. cylindraceum (tackled in 2006)

 

 

Regarding descriptions, sorry, but for most of those not in the book you have to go back to the original publication place. Of course this raises new problems in that most are not described in English.

 

 

The full ‘official’ list for Arum is:

 

1.       Arum alpinariae (K.Alpinar & R.R.Mill) P.C.Boyce

2.       Arum amoenum (Engl.) Dubovik

3.       Arum apulum (Carano) P.C.Boyce

4.       Arum balansanum R.R.Mill.

5.       Arum besserianum Schott

6.       Arum byzantinum Blume

7.       Arum concinnatum Schott

8.       Arum creticum Boiss. & Heldr.

9.       Arum cylindraceum Gasp.

10.   Arum cyrenaicum Hruby

11.   Arum dioscoridis Sm.

12.   Arum elongatum Steven

13.   Arum euxinum R.R.Mill

14.   Arum gallowayi sp. nov. ined.

15.   Arum gratum Schott

16.   Arum hainesii Agnew & Hadac ex H. Riedl

17.   Arum hygrophilum Boiss.

18.   Arum idaeum Coust. & Gandoger

19.   Arum italicum Miller      

ssp. albispathum (Steven ex Ledeb.) Prime

               ssp. canariensis (Webb. & Berth.) P.C.Boyce

20.   Arum jacquemontii Blume

21.   Arum korolkowii Regel

22.   Arum longispathum Reich.

23.   Arum maculatum L.

24.   Arum maurum (Braun-Blanq. & Maire) stat. nov. ined.

25.   Arum megobrebi Lobin, M.Neumann, Bogner & P.C.Boyce

26.   Arum melanopus Schott

27.   Arum nigrum Schott

28.   Arum orientale Bieb.

29.   Arum palaestinum Boiss.

Arum pictum L.f. = Gymnomesium pictum (L.f.) Schott

30.   Arum purpureospathum P.C.Boyce

31.   Arum rupicola Boiss.

32.   Arum sintenisii (Engl.) P.C.Boyce

 

In addition to the above, I am aware of five further novel species (but of which I have seen only images) that are in cultivation in the USA, the Netherlands & Poland.

 

I am also now convinced that my treatment of the species A. rupicola and A. orientale were both too broad: at least A. conophalloides, Arum consobrinum Schott, and A. incomptum probably need to be resurrected.

 

Regarding ‘refereeing’ – no-one does this; it is all down to general acceptance.

 

Peter

 

 

From: aroid-l-bounces@www.gizmoworks.com [mailto:aroid-l-bounces@www.gizmoworks.com] On Behalf Of DAVID LEEDY
Sent: Saturday, 28 January, 2012 2:37 AM
To: Discussion of aroids
Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Growing arums in pots

 

Dear Peter,

 

The problem with writing a book is that you now become the expert on that subject, even when you want to go on to other things.  I hope you bear with me (us).

 

Your 1993 book, "The Genus Arum," lists 25 species.  I read in the publication of Arum megobrebi (2007?) that there are now 29 species.  I assume that numbers 26-28 were described in the 2006 revision of your book.

 

Is there someplace, other than the 2006 revision, that I can find those descriptions?  How many species are there now in 2011, what are they, and how can I find descriptions?

 

Also, if I read your book correctly (ref. page 133), arum detruncatum, as shown in Vol. 30 - 2007 issue of AROIDEANA should have been labeled as arum rupicola, var. rupicola.  Was that an error in AROIDEANA?

 

Again, I apologize for my inability to read "scientific stuff," but aren't Bedalov and Kupfer suggesting that A. cylindraceum and A. sintensii are species in their 2006 article "Studies on the Genus Arum" in Vol. 29 of AROIDEANA?  Also, in their species charts, they seem to have omitted both A. alpinum and A. lucanum.  If they are of the A. alpinum = A. maculatum school, as described in your book, then I can understand why they may have omitted it.  However, you have listed A. lucanum as being from Southern Italy, so one would think that it should have been included in their charts?  

 

So, just how many species are there now?  What are they?  Where can descriptions be found?  And is a referee or umpire needed for taxonomists?

 

Thank you.

 

David Leedy, Arum Fervidus Novus



--- On Tue, 1/24/12, D. Christopher Rogers <branchiopod@gmail.com> wrote:


From: D. Christopher Rogers <branchiopod@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Growing arums in pots
To: "Discussion of aroids" <aroid-l@www.gizmoworks.com>
Date: Tuesday, January 24, 2012, 9:44 AM

Aw, shucks!

 

I really was hoping. Ah, well. I just love that genus. I am watching to see how my collection of Arum survives now that I have moved to Kansas. I lost the purpureospathum. The Arum pictums are in pots, sitting in a cool window in my house, as they would never survive the cold here. The others seem to be okay, so far . . .

 

No, I did not see the "Decade of Change" paper . . . where was that published?

Happy days,

Christopher

On Mon, Jan 23, 2012 at 5:35 PM, Peter Boyce <phymatarum@googlemail.com> wrote:

Hi Christopher,

 

Probably never. The taxonomy and nomenclature will be kept up to date with periodic papers – did you get ‘the ‘Decade of Change’ paper – but that aside the new monograph will be someone else’s challenge!

 

Very best as ever

 

Peter

 

From: aroid-l-bounces@www.gizmoworks.com [mailto:aroid-l-bounces@www.gizmoworks.com] On Behalf Of D. Christopher Rogers
Sent: Friday, 20 January, 2012 11:44 PM
To: Discussion of aroids


Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Growing arums in pots

 

Hey, Peter!

 

When are you going to publish a new, updated and expanded edition of your Arum book?

 

Grins,

Christopher

On Thu, Jan 19, 2012 at 11:40 PM, Peter Boyce <phymatarum@googlemail.com> wrote:

Hi Don,

I grew a lot of Arum in pots in the past. You need to use deep
straight-sided pots at least 12 inches, preferably 15 inches deep; the
problem is that pots this deep tend to be very wide too, so you may have to
shop around.

Growing media for the Mediterranean species (such as those that you list)
needs to have a good proportion of mineral soil and also should to be on the
alkaline side of neutral (8.5 or thereabouts). I used to mix a proprietary
peat-based soilless-potting medium with the same volume of good quality
sieved topsoil. To every 10 gallons of this mix I would add a heaped 6 inch
pot of 1/2 inch limestone chippings.

Tubers need to be planted ca half way down the pot. I used to re-pot
annually in late N Hemisphere summer (late August); by this time the tubers
will be becoming active but there won't be much root growth. Plant and then
water well and then don't water again until the shoots appear above soil.
Arum are greedy plants and well-repay heavy fertilizing by producing larger
tubers. I used to use a fertilizer branded for use on tomatoes. When
actively growing I would fertilize on every watering and the manufacturers
rate.

Under glass Arum need a buoyant atmosphere and high light. Ventilate well on
all but the very coldest days. The pots should also be given a fair bit of
room between - too close together and the plants can become very etiolated
and become prone to leaf fungus such as botrytis.

Arum flower towards the late middle of their growing cycle. Some gardening
books advocate easing back on water and ceasing fertilizer when the
inflorescences appear. This is wrong. The plants still have a few weeks
growing ability during flowering and it is at this time that nutrients from
the leaves are absorbed by the tuber; curtailing the growing period can mean
smaller tubers. I recommend that you keep the plants actively growing as
long as possible to ensure a decent sized (or better still, more) tubers for
the next year.

Once it is clear that the plants really are dying back (most leaves yellow)
stop fertilizing and reduce watering to just enough to stop the pot becoming
completely dry. While the plants are dormant it is better to leave the
tubers in the pot and not take them out. I experimented quite a lot of
tubers of which I had an excess and can say that tubers removed from the
soil and stored were always weaker than undisturbed tubers. It is also
important that the resting pots do NOT ecome excessively dry. Despite the
desiccated appearance of the Mediterranean countryside during summer digging
down a few inches always reveals damp soil. Arum (indeed all Med. aroids)
are always deep-buried in nature and certainly never become totally dry. It
is also worth keeping the resting pots someplace not too hot and certainly
not exposed to sun - again the soil in the wild is always cool at the level
the tubers occur, no matter how parched the countryside.

Hope this helps some

Pete



-----Original Message-----
From: aroid-l-bounces@www.gizmoworks.com
[mailto:aroid-l-bounces@www.gizmoworks.com] On Behalf Of Don Martinson
Sent: Friday, 20 January, 2012 10:23 AM
To: aroid-l@gizmoworks.com
Subject: [Aroid-l] Growing arums in pots

I'd like to try growing some of the Arum species (A. dioscorides v. syriacum
and A.creticum), but will have to do it in pots as I'm virtually certain
they wouldn't be hardy in my climate.  I have a cool greenhouse available in
winter.

Is there anyone else growing these (or similar) in pots that can give me
some helpful hints (media, growing cycle, etc.)?

Thanks,


Don Martinson
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

mailto:llmen@wi.rr.com



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--

D. Christopher Rogers
((,///////////=======<
785.864.1714

Crustacean Taxonomist and Ecologist
Kansas Biological Survey
Kansas University, Higuchi Hall
2101 Constant Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66047-3759 USA


Associate Editor, Journal of Crustacean Biology http://www.thecrustaceansociety.org/

 

Vice President, Southwest Association of Freshwater Invertebrate Taxonomists SAFIT.ORG

 
_______________________________________________
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--

D. Christopher Rogers
((,///////////=======<
785.864.1714

Crustacean Taxonomist and Ecologist
Kansas Biological Survey
Kansas University, Higuchi Hall
2101 Constant Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66047-3759 USA


Associate Editor, Journal of Crustacean Biology http://www.thecrustaceansociety.org/

 

Vice President, Southwest Association of Freshwater Invertebrate Taxonomists SAFIT.ORG



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Aroid-L mailing list
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http://www.gizmoworks.com/mailman/listinfo/aroid-l




--
D. Christopher Rogers
((,///////////=======<
785.864.1714
Crustacean Taxonomist and Ecologist
Kansas Biological Survey
Kansas University, Higuchi Hall
2101 Constant Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66047-3759 USA

Associate Editor, Journal of Crustacean Biology http://www.thecrustaceansociety.org/
 
Vice President, Southwest Association of Freshwater Invertebrate Taxonomists SAFIT.ORG

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