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Re: Name for Giraffe Knee


Peter, 
Thank you for sharing this information with me.

If the G. boivinii had been given to you by Josef Bogner from Munich so
long ago, is this a rare plant at all?  May be best if kept in the
botanical gardens collection then.  It would certainly be interesting to
see it in the grey shade as well.  The leaves on this are a very deep
green.  

Have you had many tubers created in the years you have had that green G.
boivinii, or are they hard to propagate?  

Thank you, Lucy Sampson
wiz@texas.net

<Interested to hear that you have the all green form of G. boivinii.
There is a spectacular grey and three shades of green clone (the same as
the plant used to describe this species) in cultivation that is worth
looking out. The Kew plant of this species (which we got from Josef
Bogner in Munich, Germanymany years ago) is the green form.>





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