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Obituary


It is with deep regret that tell you about the passing of an Icon.  Dr.
Monroe Birdsey died this last week-end.  He passed in his sleep due to
Cardiac Arrest.   He had not been feeling too well for the last few weeks
but would not go to the Hospital as he was advised.  This was true to his
character.

Dr. Birdsey did his Undergraduate work at the University of Miami, his
Masters at Columbia and received his Doctoral at the University of
California, Berkeley.  His Thesis on Syngonium, though unpublished, was
considered the definitive work at the time.

He was noted for his humor.  He was a master Punsman.  His command of the
language was more than exceptional.  With this command, he shared his years
of accumulated knowledge by speaking engagements all over Florida and with
individuals with which he came in contact.

He was also a world traveler.  At least a couple times a year he would
leave for a trip to some exotic location.  Sometimes to a major world
capitol and sometimes to a very dense jungle from where he brought back
many plants that are now in common cultivation in Florida.

Monroe was one of the most generous Collectors that I have ever known.
Anyone visiting his marvelous acre in South Miami always left with an arm
loads of cuttings and plants.  He also had one of the largest private Cycad
collections in the world.

Monroe is survived by three sons who have gathered in Miami.  There will be
a Memorial Service in the garden that he developed over the past half a
century.

Again, this is a great personal loss and certainly a loss to the Aroid
Community.
Dewey Fisk

Dewey E. Fisk, Plant Nut
THE PHILODENDRON PHREAQUE
Your Source for Tropical Araceae
Go to <http://www.macconnect.com/~plantnut>







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