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RE: Typhonodorum lindleyanum/Victorias

  • To: Multiple recipients of list AROID-L <aroid-l@mobot.org>
  • Subject: RE: Typhonodorum lindleyanum/Victorias
  • From: "Horak, David" <davidhorak@bbg.org>
  • Date: Tue, 11 Jul 2000 16:48:56 -0500 (CDT)

>You will need to over-winter any you get before you build the g/house.
How
>do you presently over-winter the trop. w/ lilys??
Well, Victorias waterlilies flower and develop seed in one season.  In the
fall, the plant dies from the cold.  But because seed was produced, one
starts
a new plant the next spring.<

WOW!   They do their thing in a hurry!   I guess their pools dry out in
nature??

Most people think of Victorias as annuals but actually they are quite
capable of being perennials. But they are exceedingly demanding in their
light and water temperature requirements so that up here in the temperate
regions we treat them as annuals. V. amazonica is the more demanding of warm
water temperatures but has a more stable environment and probably is a
perennial in habitat. But, I have been told that  V. cruziana (which may be
capable of surviving as a perennial) in nature comes from further south and
evidently goes through a cool season and is functionally an annual. Here at
the Brooklyn Botanic Garden in our Aquatic House we overwintered our
Victoria Longwood Hybrid this past year. It certainly regressed
significantly but came back quickly as the days lengthened and light
intensity increased. This not an aroid issue but thought it might be of
interest.

Dave Horak

-----Original Message-----
From: Julius Boos [mailto:ju-bo@email.msn.com]
Sent: Monday, July 10, 2000 5:43 PM
To: Multiple recipients of list AROID-L
Subject: Re: Typhonodorum lindleyanum


-----Original Message-----
From: Jack Honeycutt <jhoneycutt@uswest.net>
To: Multiple recipients of list AROID-L <aroid-l@mobot.org>
Date: Monday, July 10, 2000 12:11 AM
Subject: Re: Typhonodorum lindleyanum


At 06:40 PM 7/7/2000 -0500, Julius wrote:

>I don`t think I understand---one season will give you a plant maybe 12-18"
>(INCHES!) tall--it will take several years (3-4???) at the least to get
>anything of any size!!
Oh!  OK. well, maybe I could over winter it in the small indoor pond in the
basement.<

This is not TOO difficult--an aquarium water heater, a overhead grow-light
at the correct height above the leaves, and that should do it!

By the way IF you have a couple seed to spare let me know, I know a guy that
>wants a couple.
I will be looking for seed myself.  If I find some, I'll be happy to pass
any extra out.<

OK.   When you do find a source, you should get lots, they produce LOTS of
huge, already-germinating seeds from one inflor., and produce multiple
inflor.`s at a time.

> >Might is be possible to produce seed from a plant in one growing season?<
>
>NO sir!!   This is one of the Aroid giants, my BEST guess is a growth
period
>of several years before seed!
Ah, OK.<

This is a BIG plant!

>You will need to over-winter any you get before you build the g/house.
How
>do you presently over-winter the trop. w/ lilys??
Well, Victorias waterlilies flower and develop seed in one season.  In the
fall, the plant dies from the cold.  But because seed was produced, one
starts
a new plant the next spring.<

WOW!   They do their thing in a hurry!   I guess their pools dry out in
nature??

>But most other tropical waterlilies are dug up in the fall, and the tubers
stored indoors over winter, then planted again next spring.  It is such a
big pain, that many folks just buy new tropical waterlilies the next year.
Tubers of  hardy water lilies can over winter in the bottom of a pond.  The
pond can even freeze over, but as long as the tubers don't freeze, they
will come back the following year.<

These must be cheap plants!  The late DR Monroe Birdsey in Miami bred quite
a few new ones, and treasured his plants.
Thanks for the information!

Cheers,

Julius







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