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Fwd: Dieffenbachia id

  • Subject: Fwd: Dieffenbachia id
  • From: SelbyHort@aol.com
  • Date: Wed, 20 Jun 2001 01:45:02 -0500 (CDT)

This was posted on the AABGA Collections newslist and I thought someone on 
aroid-l might know what this plant might be.

Any ideas?

Donna Atwood

In a message dated 06/19/2001 6:32:43 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 
BTan@STRYBING.ORG writes:

<< Dear Group,
 Dr. Charles Sacamano (sacamano@pvnet.com.mx) would like some help
 identifying a so-called Dieffenbachia:
 "There is a certain plant commonly available in local nurseries (in Puerto
 Vallarta, Mexico) that grows very well in shady locations. To my very great
 frustration I cannot find a scientific name for this plant in the
 literature, nor can anyone in the nursery business. It looks somewhat like a
 big Diefffenbachia with large, oval, completely green leaves that are quite
 thick (how's that for a botanical description). I have never seen it flower
 but I would sure be expecting something in the family Araceae. It is named
 here simply as 'AMOENA REINA' ( which translates as Queen Amoena). I would
 sure like to identify and label it."
 Best regards,
 Bian
 Bian Tan, Plant Collections Manager
 Strybing Arboretum & Botanical Gardens
 9th Avenue at Lincoln Way
 San Francisco, CA 94122
 
 phone: 1 - 415 - 661- 1316 ex 311,      fax: 1- 415 - 661- 3539
 btan@strybing.org <mailto:btan@strybing.org>
  >>



  • Subject: Dieffenbachia id
  • From: Bian Tan <BTan@STRYBING.ORG>
  • Date: Tue, 19 Jun 2001 15:27:29 -0700
  • Comments: cc: "Charles Sacamano (E-mail)"
Dear Group,
Dr. Charles Sacamano (sacamano@pvnet.com.mx) would like some help
identifying a so-called Dieffenbachia:
"There is a certain plant commonly available in local nurseries (in Puerto
Vallarta, Mexico) that grows very well in shady locations. To my very great
frustration I cannot find a scientific name for this plant in the
literature, nor can anyone in the nursery business. It looks somewhat like a
big Diefffenbachia with large, oval, completely green leaves that are quite
thick (how's that for a botanical description). I have never seen it flower
but I would sure be expecting something in the family Araceae. It is named
here simply as 'AMOENA REINA' ( which translates as Queen Amoena). I would
sure like to identify and label it."
Best regards,
Bian
Bian Tan, Plant Collections Manager
Strybing Arboretum & Botanical Gardens
9th Avenue at Lincoln Way
San Francisco, CA 94122

phone: 1 - 415 - 661- 1316 ex 311,      fax: 1- 415 - 661- 3539
btan@strybing.org <mailto:btan@strybing.org>






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