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Re: [Aroid-l] Anthurium veitchii types

Dear Julius and Tom,
Thank you both for your input and kind words.  I appreciated the feedback and will continue to call them both A. veitchii. 
----- Original Message -----
From: Tom Croat
Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2007 3:11 PM
Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Anthurium veitchii types

Dear Windy:  They certainly are both stunning and different I admit but taxonomically they are surely both A. veitchii.  I suspect that if we had all the variation that is exhibited in the wild, rather than just these two forms we would see that they are less distinct from one another.




Tom Croat, P. A. Schulze Curator of Botany 

Missouri Botanical Garden

Box 299, St. Louis, Missouri 63116

(314) 577-5163


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From: aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com [mailto:aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com] On Behalf Of Windy Aubrey
Sent: Tuesday, June 26, 2007 4:05 PM
To: Discussion of aroids
Subject: [Aroid-l] Anthurium veitchii types


I was wondering about these two very different types of A. veitchii that I have been growing for a while.

One form is the more typical one I had seen around for years, with wide folds and pleats in the 3 ' long thick blade.  The other form has much tighter pleats, a much, much longer and thinner in width and textured blade. 

Also this different than normal form has a spandex that turns pink.  The more typical form's spadix turns greenish.

Would these two forms both be considered the same species?

If anyone has an opinion I would really be interested in it.  This has had me sort of baffled as to what would be the correct label to put on it.

Thanks,  Windy



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