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Re: tall Alocasia 'Calidora' with a "pseudotrunk"

  • Subject: Re: tall Alocasia 'Calidora' with a "pseudotrunk"
  • From: brian lee <lbmkjm@yahoo.com>
  • Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2008 03:47:56 -0700 (PDT)

Dear Pete,

Aloha.

You are correct...I took the term and ran with it. It certainly is not an herbaceous banana stem we are talking about.  Thank you for pointing this out. 

The new Alocasia sounds very strange...was it from an area newly or rarely botanized?  It is amazing that such a large plant has not been recognized earlier.  Is it an understory plant or is it found in an open habitat?  I have a difficult time visualizing this thing...regarding the almost leafless, terminal tuft...the petioles and lamina are large...how many leaves are in the tuft?  

Aloha,

Leland

--- On Wed, 6/25/08, Peter Boyce <botanist@malesiana.com> wrote:

> From: Peter Boyce <botanist@malesiana.com>
> Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] tall Alocasia 'Calidora' with a "pseudotrunk"
> To: "Discussion of aroids" <aroid-l@gizmoworks.com>
> Date: Wednesday, June 25, 2008, 11:19 AM
> A couple of small additions. Why is this structure being
> called a 
> pseudotrunk (derivided from pseudostem); this is a true
> stem (or 'trunk'). 
> The 'pseudo' implies that the aerial 'stem'
> is formed from closely clasping 
> petiole bases and that the growth point (meristem) is
> buried away at ground 
> or below ground level (as in Dracunculus, Helicodicerous,
> many Arisaema, 
> etc.) that is not what happens when Alocasia and Xanthosoma
> begin to produce 
> erect stems long enough to become leaf-less.
> 
> Another snippet is that there is a new Alocasia from SW
> Thailand which 
> produces an erect and never decumbent trunk to 2 or more
> metres, very slim, 
> almost leafless except for a terminal tuft of 1 m petioles
> with lamina ca. 2 
> x 1 m
> 
> Pete
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Eric Schmidt" <leu242@yahoo.com>
> To: "Discussion of aroids"
> <aroid-l@gizmoworks.com>
> Sent: Wednesday, June 25, 2008 9:06 PM
> Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] tall Alocasia 'Calidora'
> with a "pseudotrunk"
> 
> 
> > Thats interesting! I know sometimes Xanthosoma
> > sagitiifolium starts to grow upright and usually falls
> > over. Alocasia 'Calidora' is probably the
> strongest
> > one we have grown and the one in the photo is the
> > tallest any of got. Alocasia 'Portora' grows
> up but
> > either falls over or declines, and the top dies off.
> > Same with Alocasia portei. Now I know why they
> > decline!
> >
> > Eric
> > Orlando,FL
> >
> >
> >
> > --- ju-bo@msn.com wrote:
> >
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> ----------------------------------------
> >> > Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2008 13:30:29 -0700
> >> > From: leu242@yahoo.com
> >> > To: aroid-l@gizmoworks.com
> >> > Subject: [Aroid-l] tall Alocasia
> 'Calidora' with a
> >> "pseudotrunk"
> >>
> >> Dear Eric,
> >>
> >> Yes, some Alocasias do grow tall.   I THINK that
> on
> >> this list, and only just recently,  Pete Boyce was
> >> describing how, in the wild, the falling leaves
> keep
> >> up with the vertical growth of an Alocasia
> >> rhizome/''trunk'', and that many
> Alocasias
> >> eventually die when potted because the grow too
> tall
> >> and there is no humus being deposited around the
> >> rhizomes for them to send new roots into.   I
> THINK
> >> he also said that many species sort of
> ''fall over''
> >> naturally and grow horizontally along the ground.
> >> He said to try growing them in a pot about 1/2
> full
> >> of medium, and adding old leaves around their
> >> rhizomes as they became taller.
> >> We find the same thing/problem with Neotropical
> >> Xanthosoma sps., the equiv. to the Asian
> Alocasias.
> >>
> >> Good Growing,
> >>
> >> Julius
> >>
> >>
> >> > I knew the tubers on some Alocasia would grow
> >> above
> >> > ground and form a "pseudotrunk" but
> didn't know
> >> they
> >> > could get this big. This is Alocasia
> 'Calidora'
> >> and it
> >> > is about 7ft tall with about 5ft of
> "trunk"
> >> >
> >> > http://tinyurl.com/4roegn
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > Eric
> >> > Orlando,FL z9b/10a
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> _______________________________________________
> >> > Aroid-L mailing list
> >> > Aroid-L@www.gizmoworks.com
> >> >
> http://www.gizmoworks.com/mailman/listinfo/aroid-l
> >> _______________________________________________
> >> Aroid-L mailing list
> >> Aroid-L@www.gizmoworks.com
> >> http://www.gizmoworks.com/mailman/listinfo/aroid-l
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Aroid-L mailing list
> > Aroid-L@www.gizmoworks.com
> > http://www.gizmoworks.com/mailman/listinfo/aroid-l
> > 
> 
> 
> 
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