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Re: SAFE HOMES FOR TROPICAL SHADE PLANTS

  • Subject: Re: SAFE HOMES FOR TROPICAL SHADE PLANTS
  • From: Rand Nicholson <writserv@nbnet.nb.ca>
  • Date: Fri, 4 May 2001 17:09:30 -0500 (CDT)

Hi Ron:
>
You wrote:

>Spathiphyllum and other aroids, Marantaceae and so many other genera and
>species are stenothermal
(snip)
>They thrive only in shade not much higher than 25% and commonly less 
>than 10% of sunlight.
(snip)
>It is
>interesting to observe the unfavourable paling of leaves of Spathiphyllum
>grown in presumably shaded greenhouses in May to those even in February.
>Observations of Peace Lilies and other "good" house plants in equitable
>homes suggest they thrive in astonishingly deeper shade than those
>recommended by greenhouse producers of un-naturally forced cultivars".
>
Will you elaborate upon this phenomenon of "leaf paling", please. I 
have a small, rather old (25 + yrs) Spathiphyllum that has recently 
exhibited this "paling" effect. It had been moved to under a 
south-west window where it receives very little direct sun, perhaps a 
couple of hours, per day. It usually blooms foolishly year long, 
giving off a delightful cinnamon scent from its white spathes. It 
seems to bloom less with the move.

Kind Regards,

Rand Nicholson

(Who had two A. konjacs bloom in succession in his living room 
because they broke dormancy early before they could be planted 
outside in Maritime Canada, East Coast. Friends and relatives were 
not delighted when they made a close inspection of the blooms, which 
all agreed were beautiful from a distance, if unusual and, somehow, 
slightly disturbing.)





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