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Re: Coco fiber (was Worm Castings)

Faster or slower, my experience with a commercial mix with a percentage of
coir was that I could not adjust my watering enough to keep things alive. A
very, very strong "no" vote from me on the material unless your growing is
very well controlled, but why bother whn composted bark has all the good
things going for it as a component of a mix.
----- Original Message -----
From: <Piabinha@aol.com>
To: "Multiple recipients of list AROID-L" <aroid-l@mobot.org>
Sent: Saturday, October 21, 2000 9:08 PM
Subject: Coco fiber (was Worm Castings)

> In a message dated 10/20/2000 11:26:57 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
> lkallus@earthlink.net writes:
> > A while ago there was a discussion about coco fiber.  I understood the
> >  general opinion to be that it broke down so rapidly that it was not a
> >  material to use in potting mixes.
> >
> i think it's the opposite, les.  coco fiber breaks down much slower than
> or orchid mixes (bark etc.).
> tsuh yang chen, nyc, USA
> http://www.egroups.com/group/orchidspecies

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