hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: [Aroid-l] Epiphytic philodendron culture


Calvin, I doubt clasping roots getting nutrients have much to do with growth to mature stage in Aroids.  Obviously they do have a role in nutrition, and I always pour fertilizer water down the totem.  But there's another phenomenon at play here.

I agree with Brian in that the Aroid must remain rooted to the totem.  I read decades ago, probably in Aroideana, that there's a particular chemical/enzyme produced in the roots when Aroids have actually rooted to wood and are in climbing mode.  The chemical is not present when it's running across the ground.  Apparently this chemical triggers the physical journey to mature stage growth, assuming other necessary factors are present, such as proper light, temps, etc.  My own theory is that the chemical/enzyme is produced only in the roots of the growing tip, which is why they start to revert to juvenile stage as soon as they are separated from the surface of the totem, or a tree. 

Russ
central Fla

Isla Verde wrote:
Thanks for all your comments!. Brian mentioned about the plant having to have established rooting on the totem as an assurance that it won't go back to juvenile leaves before lopping it off. This is interesting! Could it be due to the Hiemiphytic nature of some of these philodendrons? (that says something about the clasping/feeding roots getting some nutrients from the attached points at the totem surfaces?)
 
Calvin


Need a vacation? Get great deals to amazing places on Yahoo! Travel.

_______________________________________________ Aroid-L mailing list Aroid-L@www.gizmoworks.com http://www.gizmoworks.com/mailman/listinfo/aroid-l
_______________________________________________
Aroid-L mailing list
Aroid-L@www.gizmoworks.com
http://www.gizmoworks.com/mailman/listinfo/aroid-l


Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index



 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement