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Re: Spring plantings for fall gardens

  • Subject: [cg] Re: Spring plantings for fall gardens
  • From: "Tom Dietrich" tdietrich@metroparks.org
  • Date: Fri, 1 Apr 2005 14:39:25 -0500

  3. Spring plantings for fall gardens (Sally McCabe)

Sally:

One recommendation I would make is more about a low maintenance
technique than plant type.  Try sheet mulching around your plants.  

If everyone is not familiar with this, it basically means putting down
butcher paper (available in long rolls 2', 3' or even 4' wide), or
newspaper or  cardboard (lasts longer).  Water it when you put it down,
then keep it in place by covering it with compost or straw (avoid woody
mulches).  This keeps weeding to a minimum, plus helps retain soil
moisture.  Works especially well around big round plants like tomatoes,
squash, etc.  For bedding plants  you can still sheet mulch your
pathways to keep weeds down there.

Good luck.  I like your thinking here.

Tom

Tom Dietrich
Grow With Your Neighbors
Dayton, OH


Message: 3
Date: Fri, 1 Apr 2005 10:26:49 -0500
From: "Sally McCabe" <SMcCabe@Pennhort.org>
To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
Subject: [cg] Spring plantings for fall gardens

I'm compiling a list of low-maintenance plants, especially vegetables,
that can be planted in a school garden in spring, totally ignored (or
allowed to fend for themselves) all summer, and harvested or at least
enjoyed when the kids return in the fall.

So far we have peanuts, potatoes, pumpkins & gourds, and sunflowers.
Anyone care to add their two cents?

We're trying to get commitments from neighborhood folks to maintain the
garden over the summer, but are also trying to be realistic in our
expectations.

Thanks!

Sally McCabe, Philadelphia




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______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

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