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growers without homes

  • Subject: [cg] growers without homes
  • From: Loralee Donath donathl@carcosa.net
  • Date: Wed, 19 Apr 2006 07:55:06 -0400

Cynthia, I definitely would like to hear as much info as possible. Don,
please keep us in mind if you develop anything in Charlotte.

We are getting a neighborhood community garden off the ground in
Columbia, SC but hope to eventually have an "at-large" garden in the
city for anyone interested, including people without homes. It would be
a great project to connect with a local weekly food sharing I also
participate in (Food Not Bombs).

In any case, in the neighborhood garden we will likely have many of the
issues you describe.

Lori Donath
Carolina Peace Resource Center


> > -------- Forwarded Message --------
> > From: Don Boekelheide <dboekelheide@yahoo.com>
> > To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> > Subject: [cg] Request for feedback - garden programs for homeless
> > people
> > Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006 10:24:30 -0700 (PDT)
> > 
> > Hi, all,
> > 
> > Hope you are all doing well - we are hoping for rain
> > today, it has been very dry here (and warm).
> > 
> > Question: Is anyone on this list involved in a
> > community gardening program targeting homeless people?
> > Can you tell me where you are and how your program
> > works? Alternatively, does anyone know of any
> > community gardening or greening programs with a strong
> > element addressing the needs of homeless people?
> > 
> > Thanks!
> > 
> > Don Boekelheide
> > Urban Ministry Center
> > Charlotte, NC
> > 
> email message attachment
> > -------- Forwarded Message --------
> > From: Jim Call <jimcall@casagarden.com>
> > To: Don Boekelheide <dboekelheide@yahoo.com>,
> > community_garden@mallorn.com
> > Subject: RE: [cg] Request for feedback - garden programs for
> > homeless people
> > Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006 19:44:25 -0500
> > 
> > Don, as you, I am interested in finding out if there are any "successful"
> > gardening programs working with the homeless. I know there are many CGs (I'm
> > optimistic here) who donate their surplus harvest to food banks and
> > shelters. I'm not aware of one whose operation comes primarily from the
> > homeless... with it understood that a non-profit or some other entity
> > overseeing their efforts. I believe there was one such operation in
> > California that helped the homeless via gardening.
> > 
> > This is a link I found while cruising to a Homeless Project conducted by a
> > Jewish organization but its vague at best and looks like it never got off
> > the ground ...
> > 
> > http://www.hillel.org/Hillel/exchange.nsf/4631b84b253300e4852568da00675ff6/5
> > FBF0F751723C86185256958006578F0?OpenDocument
> > 
> > We do not have a big homeless populaton here in Huntsville as the big
> > (really big) cities.  We do have shelters for them and I inquired once about
> > the possibility of creating a garden for them at their premises if it could
> > be planted and maintained by the shelter's occupants.  I was told by a
> > person who works in the community with the homeless that it would not work
> > because it wouldn't be maintained properly.  I'm not an authoritarian on the
> > homeless so I have to rely on others experiences (for now).
> > 
> > Jim
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
> > [mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]On Behalf Of Don Boekelheide
> > Sent: Monday, April 17, 2006 12:25 PM
> > To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> > Subject: [cg] Request for feedback - garden programs for homeless people
> > 
> > 
> > Hi, all,
> > 
> > Hope you are all doing well - we are hoping for rain
> > today, it has been very dry here (and warm).
> > 
> > Question: Is anyone on this list involved in a
> > community gardening program targeting homeless people?
> > Can you tell me where you are and how your program
> > works? Alternatively, does anyone know of any
> > community gardening or greening programs with a strong
> > element addressing the needs of homeless people?
> > 
> > Thanks!
> > 
> > Don Boekelheide
> > Urban Ministry Center
> > Charlotte, NC
> > 
> > 
> > ______________________________________________________
> > The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's
> > services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find
> > out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org
> > 
> > 
> > To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com
> > 
> > To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
> > https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
> > 
> > --
> > Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
> > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> > Version: 7.1.375 / Virus Database: 267.15.2/252 - Release Date: 2/6/2006
> > 
> > --
> > Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
> > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> > Version: 7.1.375 / Virus Database: 267.15.2/252 - Release Date: 2/6/2006
> > 
> email message attachment
> > -------- Forwarded Message --------
> > From: Cynthia Price <skyprice@gmail.com>
> > To: Jim Call <jimcall@casagarden.com>
> > Cc: Don Boekelheide <dboekelheide@yahoo.com>,
> > community_garden@mallorn.com
> > Subject: [cg] Re: Request for feedback - garden programs for
> > homeless people
> > Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006 21:10:47 -0400
> > 
> > Grand Rapids (Michigan) has one garden, the Heartside Peace Garden,
> > that's in a neighborhood where most of the people are homeless, and
> > it's run by someone who's homeless, for the benefit of others who are
> > homeless. The individual who runs it is the chair of our community
> > gardens committee and is on our board. (Can tell you more off-list if
> > you're interested.) He's very reliable and dedicated, and a very good
> > thinker in terms of organizational rules and policy. This may not be
> > exactly the model you're looking for since it wasn't started by an
> > outside organization, but actually it functions somewhat that way.
> > 
> > The garden is quite informal in a lot of ways, but I know he has a lot
> > of problems with people hanging out there and drinking, as well as
> > with people who start something and don't finish it. However,
> > everything's pretty cool and what gets grown gets grown. This
> > individual also eats ONLY locally-grown food and eats a lot from his
> > garden plot -- I believe he shares his overages with other homeless
> > people -- a lot of the time he seems to survive on Jerusalem
> > artichokes during the winter (tho he gets items like kale to
> > overwinter).
> > 
> > There's also a related non-profit called The Hard Times Cafe, but I
> > don't know a great deal about it. It seems to serve meals once a week
> > at least partially sourced from the garden when possible.
> > 
> > If anyone is interested I can get you contact information.
> > 
> > Cynthia Price
> > Greater Grand Rapids Food Systems Council
> > 
> > On 4/17/06, Jim Call <jimcall@casagarden.com> wrote:
> > > Don, as you, I am interested in finding out if there are any "successful"
> > > gardening programs working with the homeless. I know there are many CGs (I'm
> > > optimistic here) who donate their surplus harvest to food banks and
> > > shelters. I'm not aware of one whose operation comes primarily from the
> > > homeless... with it understood that a non-profit or some other entity
> > > overseeing their efforts. I believe there was one such operation in
> > > California that helped the homeless via gardening.
> > >
> > > This is a link I found while cruising to a Homeless Project conducted by a
> > > Jewish organization but its vague at best and looks like it never got off
> > > the ground ...
> > >
> > > http://www.hillel.org/Hillel/exchange.nsf/4631b84b253300e4852568da00675ff6/5
> > > FBF0F751723C86185256958006578F0?OpenDocument
> > >
> > > We do not have a big homeless populaton here in Huntsville as the big
> > > (really big) cities.  We do have shelters for them and I inquired once about
> > > the possibility of creating a garden for them at their premises if it could
> > > be planted and maintained by the shelter's occupants.  I was told by a
> > > person who works in the community with the homeless that it would not work
> > > because it wouldn't be maintained properly.  I'm not an authoritarian on the
> > > homeless so I have to rely on others experiences (for now).
> > >
> > > Jim
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
> > > [mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]On Behalf Of Don Boekelheide
> > > Sent: Monday, April 17, 2006 12:25 PM
> > > To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> > > Subject: [cg] Request for feedback - garden programs for homeless people
> > >
> > >
> > > Hi, all,
> > >
> > > Hope you are all doing well - we are hoping for rain
> > > today, it has been very dry here (and warm).
> > >
> > > Question: Is anyone on this list involved in a
> > > community gardening program targeting homeless people?
> > > Can you tell me where you are and how your program
> > > works? Alternatively, does anyone know of any
> > > community gardening or greening programs with a strong
> > > element addressing the needs of homeless people?
> > >
> > > Thanks!
> > >
> > > Don Boekelheide
> > > Urban Ministry Center
> > > Charlotte, NC
> > >
> > >
> > > ______________________________________________________
> > > The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's
> > > services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find
> > > out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org
> > >
> > >
> > > To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com
> > >
> > > To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
> > > https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
> > >
> > > --
> > > Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
> > > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> > > Version: 7.1.375 / Virus Database: 267.15.2/252 - Release Date: 2/6/2006
> > >
> > > --
> > > Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
> > > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> > > Version: 7.1.375 / Virus Database: 267.15.2/252 - Release Date: 2/6/2006
> > >
> > >
> > > ______________________________________________________
> > > The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's
> > > services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find
> > > out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org
> > >
> > >
> > > To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com
> > >
> > > To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
> > > https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
> > 
> email message attachment
> > -------- Forwarded Message --------
> > From: Jim Call <jimcall@casagarden.com>
> > To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> > Subject: [cg] Upside Down Tomatoes
> > Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006 20:12:01 -0500
> > 
> > To All,
> > While wasting my life away the other night watching the TV, I came across
> > the QVC channel promoting a couple of Topsy Turvy Tomato Hanging Planters to
> > grow tomatoes upside down.  They were about 29 bucks for two.  Boy oh boy!
> > 
> > I thought about using old 5 gallon plastic buckets instead at little or no
> > cost.. then drilling holes in the bottom, inserting the tomato, adding a
> > good soil/compost mixture and lastly hanging it upside down from our arbor.
> > Because these tomato planters are like hanging baskets and receive alot of
> > heat and sun exposure, they will be irrigated by a drip system on a timer
> > (maybe twice a day).
> > 
> > One more thing, I may have to create a heavy cardboard collar around the
> > planting hole to keep the soil/plant in and to protect the tomato.
> > 
> > Any thoughts on my simple design or tomato recommendation?
> > 
> > Oh yeah, since they are grown upside down, should I call them the "Tomatoes
> > >From Down Under" or the "Outback Tomato Crop"?  :)  Whoever comes up with a
> > unique title for these unusually grown tomatoes will be acknowledged on my
> > website... www.casagarden.com.
> > 
> > Since space is a valuable commodity in the CG world, others may want to try
> > this method.
> > 
> > Thanks in advance for your recommendations/ideas.
> > 
> > Jim Call, Huntsville, Al
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > --
> > Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
> > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> > Version: 7.1.375 / Virus Database: 267.15.2/252 - Release Date: 2/6/2006
> > 
> email message attachment
> > -------- Forwarded Message --------
> > From: Brown, Jonathan, Ph.D. <Jonathan.Brown@kpchr.org>
> > To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> > Subject: [cg] Realism about the study: ECONOMIC IMPACT OF COMMUNITY
> > GARDENS
> > Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006 18:19:57 -0700
> > 
> > It's great to have this study and the researchers should be thanked for putting in a lot of hard work.  But, honestly, they are wrong to conclude that "the opening of a garden has a statistically significant positive impact on residential properties" or that "gardens have the greatest impact in the most disadvantaged neighborhoods."  The reason is that an "observational" study of this kind cannot show causality...as the authors say themselves (on page 7) while criticizing other authors' studies.  Property values are likely to have the strongest percentage growth in the places that have the lowest values to start with.  These are also the neighborhoods that were likely to have to most abandoned land where gardens could take root.
> > 
> > I'm not saying that starting gardens did not have an impact!  I'm just saying this study, while a definite contribution, does not prove it one way or the other.  If these authors want to publish their work in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, they will have to tone down their conclusions, be forthcoming about the limitations of their study, and consider other explanations for their findings.
> > 
> > Why do I stick my neck out to say these unpleasant things?  I'm a community garden manager and volunteer in Portland, Oregon.  We just went through a tough period of defending our Portland gardens from budget cuts and privatization.  Most community gardens face these fights periodically, if not perennially.  I think we lose credibility when we quote whatever seems favorable to our cause and ignore anything that seems negative.  Any gardener knows you can't grow plants that way.  The same goes for gardens--and gardeners.
> > 
> > Now back to the seedlings!
> > 
> > Jonathan Brown
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: plantlot@rcn.com [mailto:plantlot@rcn.com]
> > Sent: Saturday, April 15, 2006 7:02 PM
> > To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> > Subject: RE: [cg] Re: BRAND NEW STUDY--ECONOMIC IMPACT OF COMMUNITY
> > GARDENS
> > 
> > 
> > I went to a briefing by the researchers. They used the data from 
> > Council on the Environment's Community Garden Mapping 
> > Project to locate the gardens and determine the dates the 
> > gardens started. In fact the study would have been much more 
> > difficult and time consuming without the CGMP data.
> >  
> > I read the paper and this is a serious academic, real estate /law 
> > study. As the researchers explained to us, the real estate 
> > developers / industry has the money to pay for studies to show 
> > the economic benefits of building on a parcel of land. 
> > Communirty Gardeners don't have the money.
> > 
> > Mike McGrath pointed out, the best paragraph we can take from 
> > the study clearly shows that cgs have a positive impact on the 
> > value nearby residential properties. (Not such a clear impact on 
> > commercial properties). (Paragraph copied below)
> > Another great quote from the study,
> > "Our results show that such gardens can lead to increases in tax 
> > revenues of around $1 million per garden over a 20 year period.
> > "
> > 
> > These are NYC real estate numbers so the impact may be less in 
> > other cities...
> > According to the researchers these are conservative estimates 
> > and take into account costs incurred by the city in the creation 
> > and maintenance of the garden. As many people may realize 
> > those are not easy figures to estimate.
> > 
> > "We find that the opening of a community garden has a 
> > statistically significant positive impact on residential properties 
> > within 1000 feet of the garden, and that the impact increases 
> > over time. We find that gardens have the greatest impact in the 
> > most disadvantaged neighborhoods. Higher quality gardens have 
> > the greatest positive impact. Finally, we find that the opening of 
> > a garden is associated with other changes in the neighborhood, 
> > such as increasing rates of homeownership, and thus may be 
> > serving as catalysts for economic redevelopment of the 
> > community."
> > 
> > I have asked ACGA to post the paper or a link on the ACGA 
> > website.
> > 
> > Lenny Librizzi
> > 
> email message attachment
> > -------- Forwarded Message --------
> > From: Marilyn <dorlandm@iowatelecom.net>
> > To: Jim Call <jimcall@casagarden.com>, community_garden@mallorn.com
> > Subject: Re: [cg] Upside Down Tomatoes
> > Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006 21:24:40 -0500
> > 
> > Jim,
> > I would think a good name might be Upside Down Tomato. I like Topsy, Turvey,
> > too. Maybe Hang by the Heels tomato would work.
> > 
> > I have seen the directions on how to do this using a 5 gallon bucket. It
> > said to use a tall tomato plant so that when planted, it reaches within
> > about four or five inches from the top of the bucket while you only leave
> > about three inches of the plant sticking out of the bottom of the pail. The
> > instructions said to use moss around the hole/plant in the bottom to keep
> > the soil in place.  It also said one could grow a cover crop such as lettuce
> > on the top to act as a mulch or put the bucket lid on to maintain the
> > moisture level somewhat. I wouldn't think lettuce wouldn't be such a good
> > crop there when the heat hits. Instructions said when the plant was
> > developed it would need watering nearly every day along with fertilizing
> > frequently. Be sure to use potting soil in the bucket.
> > 
> > Me and my co-coordinator are planning to do this very thing and make a
> > bracket to hang them on each side of our main gate sign in our community
> > gardens. I haven't decided what variety of tomato would work the best. Good
> > luck with yours and hoping for success with ours as well. Maybe we can have
> > a contest with pictures so we can decide who had the most success followed
> > with a write up of their method used.
> > Marilyn
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Jim Call" <jimcall@casagarden.com>
> > To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> > Sent: Monday, April 17, 2006 8:12 PM
> > Subject: [cg] Upside Down Tomatoes
> > 
> > 
> > > To All,
> > > While wasting my life away the other night watching the TV, I came across
> > > the QVC channel promoting a couple of Topsy Turvy Tomato Hanging Planters
> > to
> > > grow tomatoes upside down.  They were about 29 bucks for two.  Boy oh boy!
> > >
> > > I thought about using old 5 gallon plastic buckets instead at little or no
> > > cost.. then drilling holes in the bottom, inserting the tomato, adding a
> > > good soil/compost mixture and lastly hanging it upside down from our
> > arbor.
> > > Because these tomato planters are like hanging baskets and receive alot of
> > > heat and sun exposure, they will be irrigated by a drip system on a timer
> > > (maybe twice a day).
> > >
> > > One more thing, I may have to create a heavy cardboard collar around the
> > > planting hole to keep the soil/plant in and to protect the tomato.
> > >
> > > Any thoughts on my simple design or tomato recommendation?
> > >
> > > Oh yeah, since they are grown upside down, should I call them the
> > "Tomatoes
> > > From Down Under" or the "Outback Tomato Crop"?  :)  Whoever comes up with
> > a
> > > unique title for these unusually grown tomatoes will be acknowledged on my
> > > website... www.casagarden.com.
> > >
> > > Since space is a valuable commodity in the CG world, others may want to
> > try
> > > this method.
> > >
> > > Thanks in advance for your recommendations/ideas.
> > >
> > > Jim Call, Huntsville, Al
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > --
> > > Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
> > > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> > > Version: 7.1.375 / Virus Database: 267.15.2/252 - Release Date: 2/6/2006
> > >
> > >
> > > ______________________________________________________
> > > The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of
> > ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to
> > find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org
> > >
> > >
> > > To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com
> > >
> > > To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
> > https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
> > 
> email message attachment
> > -------- Forwarded Message --------
> > From: Adam36055@aol.com
> > To: Jonathan.Brown@kpchr.org, community_garden@mallorn.com
> > Subject: Re: [cg] Realism about the study: ECONOMIC IMPACT OF
> > COMMUNITY GARDENS
> > Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006 22:45:32 EDT
> > 
> > Jonathan, 
> >  
> > The reason  why this NYU and the Whitmire Study out of St. Louis's  Gateway 
> > Greening (_http://stlouis.missouri.org/gatewaygreening/WhitmireStudy.htm_ 
> > (http://stlouis.missouri.org/gatewaygreening/WhitmireStudy.htm) )  on the Economic 
> > Impact of Community Gardens are important to us in  the real world is this: 
> >  
> > When community gardeners are going to highly politicized zoning meetings,  
> > when they're trying to justify their existence to folks who want something else  
> > built on these lots having tomes of studies which the staffers will  read and 
> > summarize for the electeds and appointed is really important. Piles of  
> > studies, bore the suckers to tears - with great digestable quotes - you really  
> > want these. 
> >  
> > I mean, stories like mine, when the classic blood-sucking  landlord walked up 
> > to me, bent over gardening in NYC's Clinton Community Garden  and handed me a 
> > couple of twenties and said, " Keep it up kid, I'm making  more money off of 
> > the apartments with garden views than I though I ever would,"  are considered 
> > anecdotal in a legislative setting. 
> >  
> > But dollars for donuts, well kept, accessible, community managed public  
> > space is an excellent amenity, ad I'm really happy about any pile of  academic 
> > studies that I can bore a legislator and her staff with.  
> >  
> > Keep those cards, letter, footnoted studies coming. It's called baffling  
> > them with bull$#@&
> >  
> > Regards, 
> > Adam Honigman
> > Hell's Kitchen, 
> > NYC
> >  
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > It's  great to have this study and the researchers should be thanked for 
> > putting in  a lot of hard work.  But, honestly, they are wrong to conclude that 
> > "the  opening of a garden has a statistically significant positive impact on  
> > residential properties" or that "gardens have the greatest impact in the most  
> > disadvantaged neighborhoods."  The reason is that an "observational"  study of 
> > this kind cannot show causality...as the authors say themselves (on  page 7) 
> > while criticizing other authors' studies.  Property values are  likely to have 
> > the strongest percentage growth in the places that have the  lowest values to 
> > start with.  These are also the neighborhoods that were  likely to have to 
> > most abandoned land where gardens could take  root.
> > 
> > I'm not saying that starting gardens did not have an  impact!  I'm just 
> > saying this study, while a definite contribution, does  not prove it one way or the 
> > other.  If these authors want to publish  their work in a peer-reviewed 
> > scientific journal, they will have to tone down  their conclusions, be forthcoming 
> > about the limitations of their study, and  consider other explanations for 
> > their findings.
> > 
> > Why do I stick my neck  out to say these unpleasant things?  I'm a community 
> > garden manager and  volunteer in Portland, Oregon.  We just went through a 
> > tough period of  defending our Portland gardens from budget cuts and 
> > privatization.  Most  community gardens face these fights periodically, if not 
> > perennially.  I  think we lose credibility when we quote whatever seems favorable to our 
> > cause  and ignore anything that seems negative.  Any gardener knows you can't  
> > grow plants that way.  The same goes for gardens--and  gardeners.
> > 
> > Now back to the seedlings!
> > 
> > Jonathan  Brown
> > 
> email message attachment
> > -------- Forwarded Message --------
> > From: Marilyn <dorlandm@iowatelecom.net>
> > To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> > Subject: Fw: [cg] Upside Down Tomatoes
> > Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2006 04:41:16 -0500
> > 
> >  Jim,
> >  Great idea with the scarecrow!!
> >  Marilyn
> > 
> email message attachment
> > -------- Forwarded Message --------
> > From: Ken Hargesheimer <minifarms@gmail.com>
> > To: comfood@elist.tufts.edu <comfood@elist.tufts.edu>,
> > community_garden@mallorn.com
> > Subject: [cg] eating arsenic
> > Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2006 06:41:34 -0500
> > 
> > *ORGANIC BYTES #79
> > Health, Justice and Sustainability News Tidbits with an Edge!*
> > The Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy has released a new study
> > revealing arsenic is present in most non-organic chicken products. Testing
> > of 155 samples from supermarket chicken products found 55 percent carried
> > detectable levels arsenic, a highly toxic carcinogen. All 90 fast food
> > chicken products contained arsenic. The toxin levels are due to the industry
> > practice of adding arsenic to chicken feed with the goal of killing
> > parasites and promoting growth. Arsenic is not allowed in organic chicken
> > feed. http://www.organicconsumers.org/foodsafety/arsenic060405.cfm
> > 
> > Ken Hargesheimer
> > 
> > 
> > 
> ______________________________________________________
> The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org
> 
> To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com
> 
> To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:  https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:  https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden





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