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Re:City funding

  • Subject: [cg] Re:City funding
  • From: "Shelly Collins" tgrows@toledogarden.org
  • Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2002 14:08:55 -0500

Hi Amanda...
In Toledo (your neighbor), here's what we get from the "city".

Our community gardening program is part of Toledo Botanical Garden, which
receives support from the City of Toledo, but no "direct" support to our cg
program, Toledo GROWs.  The city owns the land--56 acres, and the buildings,
and maintains the buildings.  They provide 2 hort staff (not cg staff), and
a few other things like vehicles and their maintenance. GROWs uses these
vehicles and equipment that is on-grounds for cg--like the dump truck (for
dumping compost), tractor & tiller, trailer, generator, etc.  The amount the
city gives the Garden each year dwindles.  The mayor appoints our board of
directors.

One of our city council members has given $5000 of discretionary Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds each year for the last few years.

The new mayor forwarded us $10,000 this year upon learning about our GROWs
program, from a discretionary fund he had.  As a reward, I gave him a gift
basket I made up of youth garden entrepreneurial products that I bought at
the Cleveland Symposium last summer.  He says he would like to see 200
community gardens in Toledo.  (can he back that up with funds?)

We receive CDBG funds every year--federal funds administered by the City of
Toledo Dept. of Neighborhoods.  There is alot of paperwork--reporting and
documentation that goes along with the $16,000 we received this year, cut
from $20,000 we received in previous years.  Our CDBG funding goes towards
salaries.  Many other cg programs receive CDBG funds.

Hope this helps!
Shelly
Toledo GROWs
Toledo Botanical Garden
We are stardust  .  .  . we are golden  .  .  . and we've got to get
ourselves back to the garden.

Shelly Collins
Toledo GROWs Manager
Toledo Botanical Garden
5403 Elmer Drive
Toledo, Ohio  43615
419-936-2990
tgrows@toledogarden.org
"Enriching you life through gardens, the arts and nature"
www.toledogarden.org
----- Original Message -----
From: <community_garden-admin@mallorn.com>
To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
Sent: Monday, December 09, 2002 8:29 PM
Subject: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1249 - 10 msgs


>
> Send community_garden mailing list submissions to
> community_garden@mallorn.com
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the web, visit
> https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
> community_garden-request@mallorn.com
> You can reach the person managing the list at
> community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
> "Re: Contents of community_garden digest..."
>
>
> Today's Topics:
>
>   1. Chutney Reader Inaugural Edition - December 2002 (Laura Berman)
>   2. RE: good community garden book? (REX SCATES)
>   3. Raise beds (Honigman, Adam)
>   4. RE: good community garden book? (John Verin)
>   5. good community garden book (a.h.steely)
>   6. cg] Selling the Garden (Jon Rowley)
>   7. Re: Raise beds (Lekoma Akate)
>   8. Re: Raise beds (Deborah Mills)
>   9. county/city funding (Amanda Maria Edmonds)
>   10. Re: good community garden book? (and compost ?) (Don Boekelheide)
>
> --__--__--
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Mon, 09 Dec 2002 13:36:24 -0500
> From: Laura Berman <laura@foodshare.net>
> To: ACGA listserve <community_garden@mallorn.com>,
> Canadian Community Gardens <cancommgardens@yahoogroups.com>
> Subject: [cg] Chutney Reader Inaugural Edition - December 2002
>
> Chutney Reader Inaugural Edition - December 2002
> Plain text format
>
> *    Wayne Roberts Goes on a Welfare Diet-- And Eats his Words
> *    The Mandate of His Life: Lula Targets Zero Hunger
> *    Free Lunch for High School Students
> *    Booming Organic Movement Navel-Gazes at Victoria Conference
> *    Achieving World Domination through the Media
> *    ... And Through Effective Advocacy
> *    More about the Chutney Reader: Who we are, subscribe/unsubscribe,
etc.
>
> Welcome to the first edition of Chutney Reader, a spicy mix of food news,
> analysis and tips for all you underpaid, overworked staff and volunteers
in
> community-based food programs-- as well as all of you unaffiliated folks
who
> are just interested in food issues from soup to nuts.
>
> We'll be reporting from the food security front line: the latest trends,
> innovations, program models in nutrition, agriculture and food justice. We
> might even throw in a recipe or two. We intend the Chutney Reader to act
as
> resource that will provoke and inspire you to take creative action to
build
> a food system that truly nourishes people and communities.
>
> Please help us out and let us know if you want to receive this as html or
> plain text.(chutney@foodshare.net) If you're  having troubles reading
this,
> or if something's buggy - we're still working it out.
>
>
>
> Chutney Reader Inaugural Edition - December 2002
>
> *    Wayne Roberts Goes on a Welfare Diet-- And Eats his Words
> *    The Mandate of His Life: Lula Targets Zero Hunger
> *    Free Lunch for High School Students
> *    Booming Organic Movement Navel-Gazes at Victoria Conference
> *    Achieving World Domination through the Media
> *    ... And Through Effective Advocacy
> *    More about the Chutney Reader: Who we are, subscribe/unsubscribe,
etc.
>
> Welcome to the first edition of Chutney Reader, a spicy mix of food news,
> analysis and tips for all you underpaid, overworked staff and volunteers
in
> community-based food programs-- as well as all of you unaffiliated folks
who
> are just interested in food issues from soup to nuts.
>
> We'll be reporting from the food security front line: the latest trends,
> innovations, program models in nutrition, agriculture and food justice. We
> might even throw in a recipe or two. We intend the Chutney Reader to act
as
> resource that will provoke and inspire you to take creative action to
build
> a food system that truly nourishes people and communities.
>
> For those of you who have difficulty reading html, we're attaching an rtf
> version as well - please help us out and let us know
(chutney@foodshare.net)
> if you're still having troubles reading this, or if something's buggy -
> we're still working it out. If you're forwarding to a list, the rtf will
> probably work better.
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Wayne Roberts Goes on a Welfare Diet-- And Eats his Words
> "When I went on a welfare diet last week, I didn¹t realize just how
quickly
> I would have to swallow my pride. At the request of Daily Bread Food Bank,
> about 20 politicians, journalists and policy wonks agreed to try eating on
> the same budget as people on social assistance. Having preached ³voluntary
> simplicity² for years, I figured our family of three could make do with a
> weekly food allowance of $49.95, the amount of a welfare cheque for three
> that Daily Bread said would be left after paying $690 for rent, $18 for
TTC
> tickets, $6.60 for a basic phone, and $10.45 for laundry, personal (soap,
> toothpaste) and household (cleaners, toilet paper) goods...."
>
> Full story: http://www.foodshare.net/chutney/welfare.htm
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> The Mandate of His Life: Lula Targets Zero Hunger
> ³If every Brazilian can have three meals a day when my mandate expires, I
> will have carried out the mandate of my life.² President-elect Luiz
Ignacio
> "Lula" da Silva has pledged to eliminate hunger in Brazil, using a
> multidimensional, pragmatic approach that aims for long-term structural
> change to the country's food security, as well as short-term solutions.
The
> obstacles are huge: Brazil is beset by IMF structural adjusters, massive
> poverty, debt, inflation and jumpy investors-- not to mention a hostile
> superpower to the north who has nerve-wrackingly called the government
> part of a new Latin American "axis of evil." So can Lula do it? Well, at
> least he's trying.
>
> Full story: http://www.foodshare.net/chutney/lula.htm
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Free Lunch for High School Students
> Most student nutrition programs are based in elementary schools. But we
all
> know high school students have mouths on them too. Obesity and
> eating disorders are growing problems in our society, yet fries and coke
> seem to be the best we can offer in high school cafeterias. The Contact
> Alternative School's popular breakfast and lunch program demonstrates how
> vital practical food supports can be for youth--
> especially those marginalized by poverty and other issues.
>
> Full story: http://www.foodshare.net/chutney/school.htm
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Booming Organic Movement Navel-Gazes at Victoria Conference
> The organic food sector: a growing movement or growth industry? Organic
> food sales continue to grow at a rate of 15-20% per year, but as the
> corporate food players start to jump into the game long-term organic
> advocates, who believe in a holistic philosophy of agriculture, worry that
> key principles are being compromised. Wayne Roberts reports from the IFOAM
> conference.
>
> Full story: http://www.foodshare.net/chutney/organic conference.htm
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Achieving World Domination through the Media
> Feel like you should be running the world, but media seem determined to
> ignore your great ideas and worthy programs? Need some publicity but the
> thought of approaching journalists makes you sweat? You need a pep talk
and
> some practical tips. Kathryn Scharf talks to senior journalist Laurie
> Monsebraaten of the Toronto Star about her do's and don'ts for
megalomaniac
> community groups.
>
> Full story: http://www.foodshare.net/chutney/media.htm
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> ... And Through Effective Advocacy
> If you want to know the way to the heart of a politician, who better to
ask
> than the politician herself? Toronto Councillor Pam McConnell (albeit a
> soft-hearted specimen) has many years experience of community groups
> approaching her for support for their programs and issues, and shares some
> sound tips for would-be community lobbyists.
>
> Full story: http://www.foodshare.net/chutney/advocacy.htm
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Just who is this"we": The Chutney Reader is a bi-monthly co-production of
> FoodShare Toronto and the Toronto Food Policy Council, edited by Kathryn
> Scharf (soon to be on maternity leave, so thereafter by Jennifer
Reynolds).
> Feedback and submissions are welcomed; please send to
chutney@foodshare.net
> along with requests to subscribe or unsubscribe-- please indicate
"subscribe
> (or unsubscribe)" in the subject line.
>
> The scope of topics of the Chutney Reader is wide-ranging, so consider
> subscribing whether or not you live in Toronto. FoodShare has another
email
> list for local news and events, for which you can sign up by sending an
> email to info@foodshare.net, with the words "subscribe (or
> unsubscribe) local news" in the subject line.
>
> For those who'd like to keep their finger right on the everyday pulse of
> food issues, the Toronto Food Policy Council operates a list-serve that
puts
> out daily articles on a wide range of topics related to food. To
subscribe,
> contact tfpc@toronto.ca.
>
> The Chutney Reader is part of a larger online "Learning Centre" project,
> which will be launched shortly. It will include a resources and
publications
> database, as well as food program how-to kits and online workshops. Thanks
> to the Volunteer Action Online program of the Province of Ontario's
Ministry
> of Citizenship, Culture and Education for the funding support necessary to
> make this project possible.
>
> Bookmark us at www.foodshare.net if you want to keep abreast of learning
> centre developments.
>
> Please let us know at chutney@foodshare.net if you are having trouble
> viewing the newsletter in html or rtf format > and we¹d appreciate your
help.
>
>
>
> --__--__--
>
> Message: 2
> From: "REX SCATES" <rexscates@msn.com>
> To: Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com, jenlauzon@hotmail.com,
> community_garden@mallorn.com
> Cc: betsy@bostonnatural.org
> Subject: RE: [cg] good community garden book?
> Date: Mon, 09 Dec 2002 10:47:43 -0800
>
>
>
> thnaks for all the help :)
>
> now to buy a few and attempt to estimate the amount of compost to order
from
> our recycling company. (free except for the truck) :)
>
> any suggestions on what to how to make raised beds last more than 3-4
years?
>
>
>
>
> >From: "Honigman, Adam" <Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com>
> >To: "'Jennifer Lauzon'" <jenlauzon@hotmail.com>, rexscates@msn.com,
> >community_garden@mallorn.com
> >CC: "'betsy@bostonnatural.org'" <betsy@bostonnatural.org>
> >Subject: RE: [cg] good community garden book?
> >Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2002 10:05:02 -0500
> >
> >The best written, one volume treatment of community gardening remains,
> >Jobb, J.  (1979).  The Complete Book of Community Gardening.  New York:
> >William Morrow and Co. Every time I get the bug to write one, I just pick
> >Jobb's book and realize that even after 23 years, it's hard to beat for
> >historical context and down to earth, practical advice. Because this book
> >is
> >so good, it's usually missing from most public libraries (i.e.,  "Steal
> >this
> >Book!" ) I obtained my copy from Amazon.
> >
> >Another fine cg book that you'll find missing from your in local library
is
> >
> >
> >A Handbook of Community Gardening
> >By Boston Urban Gardeners - Edited By Susan Naimark
> >Charles Scribner's Sons - New York 1982
> >SB457.3.H26 635  81-23302
> >
> >ISBN 0-684-17466-9  AACR2
> >
> >While it's out of print,   you can purchase a copy through ACGA
treasurer,
> >Betsy Johnson (I think she  has a few copies left.)
> >
> >Betsy's contact information:
> >
> >Elizabeth (Betsy) Johnson
> >Boston Natural Areas Network
> >59 Temple Place #558
> >Boston MA MA 02111
> >phone: 617-542-7696 fax: 617-542-0383
> >email: betsy@bostonnatural.org
> >
> >Best wishes,
> >
> >Adam Honigman
> >
> >-----Original Message-----
> >From: Jennifer Lauzon [mailto:jenlauzon@hotmail.com]
>
>
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> MSN 8 helps eliminate e-mail viruses. Get 2 months FREE*.
> http://join.msn.com/?page=features/virus
>
>
> --__--__--
>
> Message: 3
> From: "Honigman, Adam" <Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com>
> To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2002 14:30:03 -0500
> charset="iso-8859-1"
> Subject: [cg] Raise beds
>
> My untreated, wood frame raised bed has lasted me over 10 years now in
NYC.
> If you used brick or stone to frame your bed, it should last longer. Some
> folks do equally as well with unframed beds. Don't know why you're doing
> only 3-4 years. I mean, if you're composting and building up your soil,
3-4
> years is when you're starting to cook.
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Adam Honigman
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: REX SCATES [mailto:rexscates@msn.com]
> Sent: Monday, December 09, 2002 1:48 PM
> To: Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com; jenlauzon@hotmail.com;
> community_garden@mallorn.com
> Cc: betsy@bostonnatural.org
> Subject: RE: [cg] good community garden book?
>
>
>
>
> thnaks for all the help :)
>
> now to buy a few and attempt to estimate the amount of compost to order
from
>
> our recycling company. (free except for the truck) :)
>
> any suggestions on what to how to make raised beds last more than 3-4
years?
>
>
>
>
> >From: "Honigman, Adam" <Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com>
> >To: "'Jennifer Lauzon'" <jenlauzon@hotmail.com>, rexscates@msn.com,
> >community_garden@mallorn.com
> >CC: "'betsy@bostonnatural.org'" <betsy@bostonnatural.org>
> >Subject: RE: [cg] good community garden book?
> >Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2002 10:05:02 -0500
> >
> >The best written, one volume treatment of community gardening remains,
> >Jobb, J.  (1979).  The Complete Book of Community Gardening.  New York:
> >William Morrow and Co. Every time I get the bug to write one, I just pick
> >Jobb's book and realize that even after 23 years, it's hard to beat for
> >historical context and down to earth, practical advice. Because this book
> >is
> >so good, it's usually missing from most public libraries (i.e.,  "Steal
> >this
> >Book!" ) I obtained my copy from Amazon.
> >
> >Another fine cg book that you'll find missing from your in local library
is
> >
> >
> >A Handbook of Community Gardening
> >By Boston Urban Gardeners - Edited By Susan Naimark
> >Charles Scribner's Sons - New York 1982
> >SB457.3.H26 635  81-23302
> >
> >ISBN 0-684-17466-9  AACR2
> >
> >While it's out of print,   you can purchase a copy through ACGA
treasurer,
> >Betsy Johnson (I think she  has a few copies left.)
> >
> >Betsy's contact information:
> >
> >Elizabeth (Betsy) Johnson
> >Boston Natural Areas Network
> >59 Temple Place #558
> >Boston MA MA 02111
> >phone: 617-542-7696 fax: 617-542-0383
> >email: betsy@bostonnatural.org
> >
> >Best wishes,
> >
> >Adam Honigman
> >
> >-----Original Message-----
> >From: Jennifer Lauzon [mailto:jenlauzon@hotmail.com]
>
>
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> MSN 8 helps eliminate e-mail viruses. Get 2 months FREE*.
> http://join.msn.com/?page=features/virus
>
> --__--__--
>
> Message: 4
> charset="iso-8859-1"
> Subject: RE: [cg] good community garden book?
> Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2002 14:45:02 -0500
> From: "John Verin" <jverin@Pennhort.org>
> To: "REX SCATES" <rexscates@msn.com>, <community_garden@mallorn.com>
>
> I usually make 8'x10'x10" beds, and each takes between 1.5 and 2 cubic
yards.
> I calculate for 2 c.y. because the stuff invariably settles, so I like to
have extra on hand to top off.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: REX SCATES [mailto:rexscates@msn.com]
> Sent: Sunday, December 08, 2002 3:31 PM
> To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> Subject: [cg] good community garden book?
>
>
>
> I just received funding tobuild a community garden at my school and I have
a
> few questions.
> 1. Is their a good resource book for design the layout of a community
> garden/ or do I just have to peice one together using 3-4 books? (one on
> irrigation, one on plants, one on raised beds, one on fence building)?
>
> 2. anyone have estimated cubic yards of compost for each 1000 sqft of new
> beds? I am working on old compacted soil of slightly on the clay side of
the
> soil spectrum.
>
> ttyl
> rex
>
> thanks for help
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Add photos to your messages with MSN 8. Get 2 months FREE*.
> http://join.msn.com/?page=features/featuredemail
>
>
> ______________________________________________________
> The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of
ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to
find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org
>
>
> To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com
>
> To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
>
> --__--__--
>
> Message: 5
> From: "a.h.steely" <gfcp@mindspring.com>
> To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2002 16:54:01 -0500
> charset="iso-8859-1"
> Subject: [cg] good community garden book
>
> Warning, some of the older books are good but as we discovered last
> Wednesday at the "Woody Ornamentals" master gardeners class lots of what
> passed for knowledge has been tested by your local Agricultural College
and
> is found wanting.
>
> We were told about taproots and the real way trees get food.  The same
thing
> applies to gardening for our food.  Check with the Rodale site (marigolds
> get rid of nematodes according to Rodale but not all nematodes are bad)
and
> also check with Penn State and Cornell University for up to date advice.
(I
> added the Rodale site because I support natural farming)  The agricultural
> departments call it "Integrated Pest Management Gardening" and try to tell
> people to use as little chemical stuff as possible.  It amazes me to have
> the idea of compost being the best amendment for your soil being pushed
hard
> by Penn State people.
>
> Sincerely,
> Helen Steely
>
>
>
> --__--__--
>
> Message: 6
> From: "Jon Rowley" <rowley@nwlink.com>
> To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2002 14:59:45 -0800
> charset="iso-8859-1"
> Subject: [cg] cg] Selling the Garden
>
> Samuel,
> The "big hang-up" you describe, describes the history of nearly every
> community garden. It's a not very enjoyable part of the process. Keep at
it.
> Believe in, and above all, be enthusiastic about your vision.  Enthusiasm
is
> contagious.  And "know your product". First of all convince yourself that
> this community garden would be a good thing for the community. Who agrees
> with you? Line up your ducks as they say. Form a steering committee that
> represents a wide range of community interests. Try to get at least one
City
> Council member on board as an advocate. It comes down, as you have already
> figured out,  to "selling". Find a resident in your desired neighborhood
to
> represent the garden to the neighborhood. You'll likely need a lawyer.
> Who will garden there?  Can you line up some would-be gardeners to speak
for
> the need/desirability for a garden?  Keep adding to your list of
supporters.
> When the list is long enough, the garden, as if by magic, will happen.
>
> Here's an idea.  Build a couple of compost bins and throw a
well-advertised
> party.  Invite guests to bring browns or greens  for your garden-to-be's
> first compost even if you haven't got a location yet. What people bring
for
> the compost will be an important psychological investment in the future of
> your garden.  Have a donations jar for $$$. Sign people up on a mailing
> lest.  Have sheet for those who would like to volunteer or support the
> garden in other ways.
> It's a long road but once you've got some momentum gong it gets easier.
And
> above all be enthusiastic. People love enthusiasm.
> Good luck,
> Jon Rowley
> Interbay P-Patch
> Seattle
>
> Hey everyone,
> I'd first like to send a thank-you to everyone who sent me resources on
> starting up a garden.  While planning has gone well, the garden project
that
> City Year is working on in Columbia, SC is experiencing a big hang-up.
> We've managed to talk to potential sponsors and received some positive
> feedback, but finding an actual location has been difficult.  Both
> low-income housing developments we've called are quite reluctant to give
up
> the space, and the neighborhood we've focused on has community members
that
> are, for one reason or another, resistant.
> We've scheduled a speaking time at one community meeting.  I've also put
in
> some calls to city council.  Does anyone have good tips on selling the
idea
> of a garden?
>
>
>
> --__--__--
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Mon, 09 Dec 2002 17:23:33 -0600
> Subject: Re: [cg] Raise beds
> From: Lekoma Akate <lekoma216@cox.net>
> To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> boundary="MS_Mac_OE_3122299413_6092560_MIME_Part"
>
> > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not
understand
> this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.
>
> --MS_Mac_OE_3122299413_6092560_MIME_Part
> Content-type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
> Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit
>
> You might also consider boards or timbers made from recycled materials.
> They are more expensive, but do last a really long time.  Lekoma
>
> From: "Honigman, Adam" <Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com>
> Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2002 14:30:03 -0500
> To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> Subject: [cg] Raise beds
>
>
> My untreated, wood frame raised bed has lasted me over 10 years now in
NYC.
> If you used brick or stone to frame your bed, it should last longer. Some
> folks do equally as well with unframed beds. Don't know why you're doing
> only 3-4 years. I mean, if you're composting and building up your soil,
3-4
> years is when you're starting to cook.
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Adam Honigman
>
>
>
> --MS_Mac_OE_3122299413_6092560_MIME_Part
> Content-type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"
> Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable
>
> <HTML>
> <HEAD>
> <TITLE>Re: [cg] Raise beds</TITLE>
> </HEAD>
> <BODY>
> You might also consider boards or timbers made from recycled materials.
&nb=
> sp;They are more expensive, but do last a really long time.
&nbsp;Lekoma<BR>
> <BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
> <B>From: </B>&quot;Honigman, Adam&quot;
&lt;Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com&gt;<BR>
> <B>Date: </B>Mon, 9 Dec 2002 14:30:03 -0500 <BR>
> <B>To: </B>community_garden@mallorn.com<BR>
> <B>Subject: </B>[cg] Raise beds<BR>
> <BR>
> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
> <BLOCKQUOTE><TT>My untreated, wood frame raised bed has lasted me over 10
y=
> ears now in NYC.<BR>
> If you used brick or stone to frame your bed, it should last longer.
Some<B=
> R>
> folks do equally as well with unframed beds. Don't know why you're
doing<BR=
> >
> only 3-4 years. I mean, if you're composting and building up your soil,
3-4=
> <BR>
> years is when you're starting to cook.<BR>
> <BR>
> Best wishes,<BR>
> <BR>
> Adam Honigman <BR>
> <BR>
> </TT></BLOCKQUOTE>
> </BODY>
> </HTML>
>
>
> --MS_Mac_OE_3122299413_6092560_MIME_Part--
>
>
> --__--__--
>
> Message: 8
> From: "Deborah Mills" <deborah@greencure.org>
> To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> Subject: Re: [cg] Raise beds
> Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2002 17:15:59 -0800
> boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0079_01C29FA6.A4C8B640"
>
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
>
> ------=_NextPart_000_0079_01C29FA6.A4C8B640
> Content-Type: text/plain;
> charset="iso-8859-1"
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> Re: [cg] Raise beds
>   Lekoma,
>
>   I hope you are not talking about the "plastic" lumber that is being =
> made from recycled milk jugs. Of course, they will last "forever" but =
> here lies the problem. They will never, never, never decompose, just =
> like Styrofoam. If humans weren't so fickle about their likes and =
> dislikes and always wanting to change things around I would say great. =
> To date, plastic timbers can not be re-recycled (unless it is reused). =
> My fear is that our land fills will reach their capacity because of such =
> items.
>
>   I know it initially sounds good but together let's think of the bigger =
> picture here.
>
>   Deborah Mills
>
>
>   You might also consider boards or timbers made from recycled =
> materials.  They are more expensive, but do last a really long time.  =
> Lekoma
>
>
>     From: "Honigman, Adam" <Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com>
>     Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2002 14:30:03 -0500=20
>     To: community_garden@mallorn.com
>     Subject: [cg] Raise beds
>
>
>
>
>     My untreated, wood frame raised bed has lasted me over 10 years now =
> in NYC.
>     If you used brick or stone to frame your bed, it should last longer. =
> Some
>     folks do equally as well with unframed beds. Don't know why you're =
> doing
>     only 3-4 years. I mean, if you're composting and building up your =
> soil, 3-4
>     years is when you're starting to cook.
>
>     Best wishes,
>
>     Adam Honigman=20
>
>
>
> ------=_NextPart_000_0079_01C29FA6.A4C8B640
> Content-Type: text/html;
> charset="iso-8859-1"
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
> <HTML><HEAD><TITLE>Re: [cg] Raise beds</TITLE>
> <META http-equiv=3DContent-Type content=3D"text/html; =
> charset=3Diso-8859-1">
> <META content=3D"MSHTML 6.00.2716.2200" name=3DGENERATOR>
> <STYLE></STYLE>
> </HEAD>
> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <BLOCKQUOTE dir=3Dltr=20
> style=3D"PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =
> BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
>   <DIV style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial">Lekoma,</DIV>
>   <DIV style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial">&nbsp;</DIV>
>   <DIV style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial">I hope you are not talking about the =
> "plastic"=20
>   lumber that is being made from recycled milk jugs.&nbsp;Of course, =
> they will=20
>   last "forever" but here lies the problem. They will never, never, =
> never=20
>   decompose, just like Styrofoam. If humans weren't so fickle about =
> their likes=20
>   and dislikes and always wanting to change things around I would say =
> great. To=20
>   date, plastic timbers can not be re-recycled (unless it is reused). My =
> fear is=20
>   that our land fills will reach their capacity because of such =
> items.</DIV>
>   <DIV style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial">&nbsp;</DIV>
>   <DIV style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial">I know it initially sounds good but =
> together=20
>   let's think of the bigger picture here.</DIV>
>   <DIV style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial">&nbsp;</DIV>
>   <DIV style=3D"FONT: 10pt arial">Deborah Mills</DIV>
>   <DIV><BR></DIV>You might also consider boards or timbers made from =
> recycled=20
>   materials. &nbsp;They are more expensive, but do last a really long =
> time.=20
>   &nbsp;Lekoma<BR>
>   <BLOCKQUOTE><BR><B>From: </B>"Honigman, Adam" &lt;<A=20
>     =
> href=3D"mailto:Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com";>Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com</A>&gt;<B=
> R><B>Date:=20
>     </B>Mon, 9 Dec 2002 14:30:03 -0500 <BR><B>To: </B><A=20
>     =
> href=3D"mailto:community_garden@mallorn.com";>community_garden@mallorn.com=
> </A><BR><B>Subject:=20
>     </B>[cg] Raise beds<BR><BR></BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
>   <BLOCKQUOTE><TT>My untreated, wood frame raised bed has lasted me over =
> 10=20
>     years now in NYC.<BR>If you used brick or stone to frame your bed, =
> it should=20
>     last longer. Some<BR>folks do equally as well with unframed beds. =
> Don't know=20
>     why you're doing<BR>only 3-4 years. I mean, if you're composting and =
>
>     building up your soil, 3-4<BR>years is when you're starting to=20
>     cook.<BR><BR>Best wishes,<BR><BR>Adam Honigman=20
> <BR><BR></TT></BLOCKQUOTE></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
>
> ------=_NextPart_000_0079_01C29FA6.A4C8B640--
>
>
> --__--__--
>
> Message: 9
> Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2002 19:06:15 -0500
> From: Amanda Maria Edmonds <aedmonds@umich.edu>
> To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> Subject: [cg] county/city funding
>
>
> --Apple-Mail-1-1042033122
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
> Content-Type: text/plain;
> charset=US-ASCII;
> format=flowed
>
> I think I've asked a question similar to this before, but I'll give it a
> try again, because I didn't get response before...
>
> I am trying to find non-profit or government community gardening
> organizations who receive regular, annual funding from a city or county
> government agency.  If this is the case with your org, please tell me!
> I really want to hear what percentage of your annual operating budget
> comes from that source... I'm trying to show a local government agency
> that their peers regularly contribute to-- or even sponsor-- community
> garden orgs/programs... and to what extent.
>
> Please, share!
> Amanda
>
> Amanda Maria Edmonds
> -----===================================================---__
> "We must be the change we wish to see in the world."
>    "To forget to dig the earth and to tend the soil is to forget
> ourselves."
>                                                      - Mahatma Ghandi
>
> --Apple-Mail-1-1042033122
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
> Content-Type: text/enriched;
> charset=US-ASCII
>
> I think I've asked a question similar to this before, but I'll give it
> a try again, because I didn't get response before...
>
>
> I am trying to find non-profit or government community gardening
> organizations who receive regular, annual funding from a city or
> county government agency.  If this is the case with your org, please
> tell me!  I really want to hear what percentage of your annual
> operating budget comes from that source... I'm trying to show a local
> government agency that their peers regularly contribute to-- or even
> sponsor-- community garden orgs/programs... and to what extent.
>
>
> Please, share!
>
> Amanda
>
>
> <bold>Amanda Maria Edmonds
>
>
</bold><center>-----===<underline>==========================================
======---__
> <smaller><smaller>
> </smaller></smaller></underline><smaller><smaller> </smaller></smaller>
>
> </center><flushright>"We must be the change we wish to see in the
> world."
>
>   "To forget to dig the earth and to tend the soil is to forget
> ourselves."
>
>                                                     - Mahatma
> Ghandi
>
> </flushright>
> --Apple-Mail-1-1042033122--
>
>
> --__--__--
>
> Message: 10
> Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2002 17:28:51 -0800 (PST)
> From: Don Boekelheide <dboekelheide@yahoo.com>
> To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> Subject: [cg] Re: good community garden book? (and compost ?)
>
> Hi, Rex,
>
> Congratulations! Good questions. In reverse order -
>
> > 2. anyone have estimated cubic yards of compost for
> > each 1000 sqft of new
> > beds? I am working on old compacted soil of slightly
> > on the clay side of the
> > soil spectrum.
>
> Yep, clay. Got plenty of that in North Carolina. What
> color is it?
>
> There are 3 good answers to your question. The
> simplest is get all the good compost you can. Plus
> rotted manure, leaf mold, and any other organic matter
> you can lay hands on.
>
> More specifically, for clay soils, NC State recommends
> 11 yd3 of compost per 1000 ft2 to make a lasting and
> noticeable improvement in tilth. This translates to
> between 11 and 22 pickup loads, depending on how good
> your shocks are and how much they'll load. Our county
> compost yard has a 15 yd3 truck for $40 a load, which
> I can sometimes beg from our saintly compost and
> recycling manager Ann Gill, given a good cause like a
> community garden. Sounds like a lot, but that's only 3
> in or so to cover the soil. Dig or till that in to at
> least 6 - 8 inches. I like to use a version of 'double
> digging' as described by John Seymore (he calls it
> 'bastard trenching') or John Jeavons, though I use a
> pick for the 'under' dig the first time round.
>
> There are people who swear by 'no-till' techniques,
> but that's a separate discussion. When you are
> starting a vegetable garden, I suggest you dig the
> compost in, from my experience.
>
> Last option is to stretch things as much as you can by
> putting compost only where you need it. Figure out
> where your paths and common areas are, and don't put
> compost there. Use cheaper (usually free) deep mulch
> instead in those places. As a rule of thumb, go for
> 3-4 inches of compost wherever you need it.
>
> I also suggest doing a soil test. Do a 'standard' test
> to see what your pH (acid/base level) is (you may want
> to add limestone if that's an acidic clay soil), and
> ideally do a biological test, too. Does Dr. Elaine
> Ingham have a special community garden rate yet? (I
> like her site: www.soilfoodweb.com). Local cooperative
> extension may be able to help - find a sympathetic
> extension agent or master gardener.
>
> Last suggestion, hopefully an easy one, is to toss
> down a cover crop on any bare spots. It is a bit late,
> but down here in the south we can still loss out
> annual ryegrass. Cover crops protect and build soil.
>
> Time spent on your soil will handsomely pay off in
> healthier and more bountiful crops. Besides, it&#3to
> buildwardship in action.
>
> > I just received funding tobuild a community garden
> > at my school and I have a
> > few questions.
> > 1. Is their a good resource book for design the
> > layout of a community
> > garden/ or do I just have to peice one together
> > using 3-4 books? (one on
> > irrigation, one on plants, one on raised beds, one
> > on fence building)?
>
> In addition to the books folks have mentioned - I
> agree that Betsy Johnson's book from Boston is a gem -
> I suggest a getting a specific book on irrigation, or,
> better, seeking out a local organic farmer or master
> gardener. Robert Kourik and Hendrix and Straw both
> have both written helpful irrigation books, but they
> don't really apply directly to community gardens.
> Something that's just coming up is rain 'harvesting',
> you might want to look into that, too - we are here,
> after last summer's drought. Remember the drought?
>
> On raised beds, just remember you don't need to make
> 'boxes' for the soil out of wood. Simply mounding the
> soil is all you need (scrape that valuable topsoil
> from your paths onto each bed). If you want to
> 'outline' the beds, rubble, rocks or adobe clay bricks
> are a much less expensive alternative. Whatever you
> do, avoid poisoned wood (CCA 'pressure treated
> lumber') for lining beds, no matter what poobah wants
> to donate it. Build a deck or shed out of it instead,
> if you have to. My favorite garden design story is in
> Karen Payne and Debbie Fryman's 'Cultivating
> Community', available from ACGA - I'd add that to the
> booklist. It tells how David Hawkins and the kids at
> Martin Luther King accessibility in Berkeley, CA,
> formed beds in their garden by holding hands to create
> organic shapes.
>
> There are important cg accessability questions, true.
> It is a very good idea to build some beds that are
> truly 'raised' (table height) and on good paths, so
> people in wheelchairs and those who can't bend can
> garden. To make high beds, I like concrete block -
> there was a nice post and website on this a couple
> weeks ago, no?
>
> Seedfolks, btw, is an engaging little book. Both
> Fleishmans, son and dad, are fine writers. On the
> other hand, I like reading about gardeners in their
> own words. We'll have a book coming out with the
> stories (and recipes) of Charlotte's community
> gardeners early next year, I'll keep you all posted.
> Meanwhile, keep a journal, and encourage your
> gardeners to tell their stories.
>
> I've gone on too long, as usual. The ice storm just
> smacked us silly, large parts of Charlotte are still
> without power. It was death to Bradford pears,
> especially. I'm no Bradford fan, but I still ended up
> with a yard full of limbs to cut and haul from our elm
> and a couple of beech trees. Ugly, after all that
> pretty sparkly ice.
>
> Good luck with your garden,
>
> Don Boekelheide
> Charlotte, NC
>
> __________________________________________________
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>
>
>
> --__--__--
>
> ______________________________________________________
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>
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>
> End of community_garden Digest
>



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