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stats study


I agree that hard data will be very helpful in securing support for
community gardens. In addition to crime, there must be a way of measuring
other quality of life issues. What is the impact of having a cg on the
immediate neighborhood -- less graffiti, increased commercial activity, less
dumping, etc. -- how to measure the attractiveness of a neighborhood? The
only way I can think of is by the increase in property values - relative to
those in a comparable neighborhood without a cg. How does a cg fit into
gentrification? Does it predict it, or does it precede it?

I think there may be ways of teasing out the correlation between a cg and
community "cohesiveness." If you have a cg (which is a particular kind of
public space in that it requires community responsibility), can we also find
an increase in political participation, local shopping, community support
for local schools, local churches, community-based organizations,
environmental initiatives? The Univ. of Michigan has the best social policy
survey data I know of. I wonder if they might advise on ways to attack this
issue.

I suspect that a good study will have to combine the macro and the micro. A
few case studies will probably be necessary to describe in detail what goes
on.

The process of doing this kind of study can be as useful as the outcome. You
do a door to door survey of a neighborhood asking people about the effect of
a garden on their quality of life (do they spend more time outside? have
they met any neighbors as a result? how do they rank it as an asset compared
with, say, a bus stop, a trash can, a mail box, a post office, a dry
cleaner, a stop sign, etc. etc.) Ask all of the realtors for their estimate
of the impact on property values.

The details may reveal some things that are worth knowing -- I suspect that
a garden with a permanent, attractive fence enhances a neighborhood's values
while a vegetable-plot funky & transient looking lot may not.

Forgive the brainstorming format -- the possibilities are just too exciting!

Hilary Kitasei
"Endor" in the Bronx
 ***********************************
Please note my new e-mail address:
hilary@kitasei.com

Reporting-MTA: dns; bouncemessage.net

Final-Recipient: rfc822; community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]On
Action: Failed
Status: 5.1.2

5.0.0


I agree that hard data will be very helpful in securing support for
community gardens. In addition to crime, there must be a way of measuring
other quality of life issues. What is the impact of having a cg on the
immediate neighborhood -- less graffiti, increased commercial activity, less
dumping, etc. -- how to measure the attractiveness of a neighborhood? The
only way I can think of is by the increase in property values - relative to
those in a comparable neighborhood without a cg. How does a cg fit into
gentrification? Does it predict it, or does it precede it?

I think there may be ways of teasing out the correlation between a cg and
community "cohesiveness." If you have a cg (which is a particular kind of
public space in that it requires community responsibility), can we also find
an increase in political participation, local shopping, community support
for local schools, local churches, community-based organizations,
environmental initiatives? The Univ. of Michigan has the best social policy
survey data I know of. I wonder if they might advise on ways to attack this
issue.

I suspect that a good study will have to combine the macro and the micro. A
few case studies will probably be necessary to describe in detail what goes
on.

The process of doing this kind of study can be as useful as the outcome. You
do a door to door survey of a neighborhood asking people about the effect of
a garden on their quality of life (do they spend more time outside? have
they met any neighbors as a result? how do they rank it as an asset compared
with, say, a bus stop, a trash can, a mail box, a post office, a dry
cleaner, a stop sign, etc. etc.) Ask all of the realtors for their estimate
of the impact on property values.

The details may reveal some things that are worth knowing -- I suspect that
a garden with a permanent, attractive fence enhances a neighborhood's values
while a vegetable-plot funky & transient looking lot may not.

Forgive the brainstorming format -- the possibilities are just too exciting!

Hilary Kitasei
"Endor" in the Bronx
 ***********************************
Please note my new e-mail address:
hilary@kitasei.com








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