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Re: Plot markers

  • Subject: Re: [cg] Plot markers
  • From: Tom Tyler <ttyler@vt.edu>
  • Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2002 17:54:32 -0500

Cary,
Depending on the opinions of the gardeners, I wouldn't completely
dismiss having at least one section  of the garden set aside for
those who want or need plowing in spring, or fall, or both.  I only
say this from experience with older gardeners I worked with (and some
younger!),
some of whom feel that is the only way to garden and after 50 years
of growing sweet potatoes that way, ain't about to change. Not to
mention the physical act of having someone/somehting else turn
the soil for them, provided it is done in way that nurtures the soil
to the extent possible.  Though I personally would prefer to manage
my soil year-round, myself, some others may not. Your higher-ups might
say that having a year-round garden is unsightly (been there done that)
so in that case, lay down some rules for the gardeners and enforce them.
I have personally seen some year-round gardens that look more like junk
collections
than gardens esp. in winter.  You might try creating some sort of communal
storage 
space where people could put tomato cages and everything else under the sun
that
seems to end up in the spaces for trellises, etc., in order to hide it, or
just
require that it be gone and let them figure out whether to take it home, get
rid of it, befriend someone with a large garage in exchange for tomatoes,
yadda
yadda!  I think of a chainlink area with large gate and perhaps vinyl
screening and/or landscaping to obscure the views.

On the other hand, for those who feel strongly about year-round, ask for vols.
to 'till the gardens for those who need it.  Just some thoughts.

Tom Tyler

At 03:07 PM 1/8/02 -0500, Cary Oshins wrote:
>I am new to this list.  I have recently inherited the management of our
>County's community gardens, a total of 200 plots in 2 locations.  As far as
>anyone can remember, the plots were always mapped and staked in April,
>leased from May to October, then cleared and plowed in the fall, to be
>repeated next year.  This seemed like an incredible waste of energy by both
>the County and the gardeners, so I am pushing a move to year-round plots.  I
>am holding a meeting of interested gardeners in a few weeks to brainstorm
>probable issues and solutions, so I will probably be seeking advice often in
>the coming months.  The first issue though is probably simple.  Since the
>plots were always temporary, the parks dept staked them with simple wooden
>stakes.  Now these markers need to be more permanent.  Since this is still
>an "experiment" from upper management point of view, they can't be truly
>permanent (like concrete) but need to last at least a couple of years.  My
>inclination is 4' metal u-posts, like used for fencing.  Recycled lumber was
>too expensive.  Before we spent $800 on posts I thought this was a good time
>to check with this listserv.
>
>Thanks!
>
>Cary Oshins
>Composting Specialist
>Lehigh County Office of Solid Waste
>caryoshins@lehighcounty.org
>
>
>______________________________________________________
>The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of
ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to
find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org
>
>
>To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com
>
>To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
>
Tom Tyler
Extension Agent - Environmental Horticulture
Unit Coordinator
Virginia Cooperative Extension - Arlington County
3308 S. Stafford St.
Arlington, VA 22206

703-228-6423 (P)
703-228-6407 (F)
E-Mail: ttyler@vt.edu
<http://offices.ext.vt.edu/arlington>

President, American Community Gardening Association:
<http://www.communitygarden.org>

______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:  https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden





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