hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Fwd: [tb-cybergardens]: Emily's Great Adventure

  • Subject: [cg] Fwd: [tb-cybergardens]: Emily's Great Adventure
  • From: Adam36055@aol.com
  • Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 19:24:42 EST

In a message dated 3/14/04 2:49:12 PM Eastern Standard Time, HAJA216@aol.com writes:

Subj: Re: [tb-cybergardens]: Emily's Great Adventure
Date: 3/14/04 2:49:12 PM Eastern Standard Time
From: HAJA216@aol.com
Reply-to: cybergardens@treebranch.com
To: cybergardens@treebranch.com
Sent from the Internet



I'm coming into this late, but for what it's worth, I think Adam's suggestions are very valuable.  I wouldn't get hung up on anything but making the book (or anything else) the very best and as ethical as it can be.

That being said, those of us who have been out there in the trenches gardening and cleaning up communities for a good number of years--quite possibly long before "More Gardens!" was even a thought (not to say it's not a very good thought)--as were both Adam &Allegra &many others..., well, "those of us" have always
been concerned about individuals and groups who may, albeit perhaps unwittingly, use the gardening "issue" primarily to advance their own agenda/line their own pockets/advance their own careers.  Of course, there is no way to prove that this has happened, or does, or is--but I do think there are those times when people who have pushed themselves to make their communities better places see others who have "jumped on the bandwagon," so to speak, run off with the prize.  I think we all need to examine out motives carefully with any project we undertake.  But, especially when there is a profit to be made directly or indirectly by one or more people, we must be extra honest with ourselves about the real and exact motivation for the project.  Otherwise, we're doing no more or less than what the US of A is doing via its "Project for a New American Century" (fighting &justifying pre-emptive wars with a sort of "whiteman's burden" twist to it, when it's less "democracy" and human life, liberty &dignity that's really at stake than "US interests," aka oil, money,  power, ego, fear etc.).  Of course(I think)it's  impossible for any of us to do anything for someone/something else out of pure altruism.  If we're conscious(as opposed to un-) there's going to be some self-interest in anything we do.  Doing what I do with Project Harmony makes me happy; so there you have it; I'm acting, to a significant degree, on behalf of my own happiness even though the monetary
(& other)costs are sometimes disheartening. Still, I wouldn't say that my happiness is the raison d'etre of Project Harmony.  Hardly.  Everything I do and how I do it has something to do with my own happiness, wellbeing, survival, etc., and as such even acts of altruism aren't purely selfless. I think one needs to calculate, honestly, one's reasons for any undertaking, with an awareness of whom one's actions will impact upon and how. I believe someone in this discussion said that "proceeds from the book" would be used for "community gardens."  How? Which ones? Who decides how and what to use it for?
Maybe you've thought all this out.  Maybe the questioning is irrelevant.  Maybe it will just be what it will be.  In any case, it should be the very best it can be, so I'd say carefully consider Adam's suggestions.  He's a very smart and intelligent guy, an excellent &thoughtful writer with loads of experience.  It's unfair and in itself pastronizing to turn his comments into the ...whatever...of his grief.  They are solid, thoughtful, wise considerations
in and of themselves.

Peace--
Cindy



--- Begin Message ---
  • Subject: Re: [tb-cybergardens]: Emily's Great Adventure
  • From: HAJA216@aol.com
  • Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 14:47:33 EST
I'm coming into this late, but for what it's worth, I think Adam's suggestions are very valuable.  I wouldn't get hung up on anything but making the book (or anything else) the very best and as ethical as it can be.

That being said, those of us who have been out there in the trenches gardening and cleaning up communities for a good number of years--quite possibly long before "More Gardens!" was even a thought (not to say it's not a very good thought)--as were both Adam & Allegra & many others..., well, "those of us" have always
been concerned about individuals and groups who may, albeit perhaps unwittingly, use the gardening "issue" primarily to advance their own agenda/line their own pockets/advance their own careers.  Of course, there is no way to prove that this has happened, or does, or is--but I do think there are those times when people who have pushed themselves to make their communities better places see others who have "jumped on the bandwagon," so to speak, run off with the prize.  I think we all need to examine out motives carefully with any project we undertake.  But, especially when there is a profit to be made directly or indirectly by one or more people, we must be extra honest with ourselves about the real and exact motivation for the project.  Otherwise, we're doing no more or less than what the US of A is doing via its "Project for a New American Century" (fighting & justifying pre-emptive wars with a sort of "whiteman's burden" twist to it, when it's less "democracy" and human life, liberty & dignity that's really at stake than "US interests," aka oil, money,  power, ego, fear etc.).  Of course(I think)it's  impossible for any of us to do anything for someone/something else out of pure altruism.  If we're conscious(as opposed to un-) there's going to be some self-interest in anything we do.  Doing what I do with Project Harmony makes me happy; so there you have it; I'm acting, to a significant degree, on behalf of my own happiness even though the monetary
(& other)costs are sometimes disheartening. Still, I wouldn't say that my happiness is the raison d'etre of Project Harmony.  Hardly.  Everything I do and how I do it has something to do with my own happiness, wellbeing, survival, etc., and as such even acts of altruism aren't purely selfless. I think one needs to calculate, honestly, one's reasons for any undertaking, with an awareness of whom one's actions will impact upon and how. I believe someone in this discussion said that "proceeds from the book" would be used for "community gardens."  How? Which ones? Who decides how and what to use it for?
Maybe you've thought all this out.  Maybe the questioning is irrelevant.  Maybe it will just be what it will be.  In any case, it should be the very best it can be, so I'd say carefully consider Adam's suggestions.  He's a very smart and intelligent guy, an excellent & thoughtful writer with loads of experience.  It's unfair and in itself pastronizing to turn his comments into the ...whatever...of his grief.  They are solid, thoughtful, wise considerations
in and of themselves.

Peace--
Cindy


--- End Message ---




 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index