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RE: Transplanting Lilacs

  • Subject: RE: [cg] Transplanting Lilacs
  • From: "Honigman, Adam" <Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com>
  • Date: Thu, 30 May 2002 12:16:23 -0400

Jeneva,

I've found that it's "OK" to transplant lilacs most times, if you have to,
but it's really best to wait until November or December to dig them up. The
second best time is early spring, before they have bloomed. 

Now I am not a master gardener, but from my own personal experience, I
believe a younger plant would probably fare better than an older one - they
tend to be more finicky and set in their ways, just like people.

As a hands in the dirt gardener ( in season, I look like that Peanuts
character, "Pig Pen") I believe in soil preparation. According to the
gardening books, you should make sure that the transplant site gets at least
6 hours of sun a day and to check its soil pH ( a pH tester is a good thing
for any community garden to pick up from a garden center. ) The recommended
PH for lilacs is 6-7pH. Add lime if necessary if the pH is low. 

Because strong backs are hard to organize, it would be best to do your
preparation work on the receiving site first, including digging the holes,
so you can schlep the plants from site to site smoothly.

Best wishes,
Adam Honigman
Volunteer, Clinton Community Garden  



-----Original Message-----
From: Jeneva Storme [mailto:jenevastorme@yahoo.ca]
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2002 11:45 AM
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: [cg] Transplanting Lilacs


Greetings;

I am coordinating the renovation of a vacant lot
"guerilla garden" into a multifunctional community
garden and green space for our neighbourhood.  One of
the lots has a semicircle of trees and shrubs that
used to border the front yard of a house, which have
to be removed for safety purposes.  Some of these are
lilacs, which would be nice to salvage if we can.

Does anyone know how best to transplant these shrubs
or their shoots?  They are obviously quite old, and
have a large root system, so some of the larger ones
might not survive being dug up -- and we will probably
have to use heavy machinery to get them out.  There
are a number of younger shoots, though, which might be
successfully transplanted if we know what we're doing.
 Any suggestions along these lines would be most
helpful.

Thanks,
Jeneva Storme

=====
Greening West Broadway Coordinator
"Neighbourhood Solutions for Community Change"

West Broadway Development Corporation
640 Broadway, Winnipeg, MB  R3C 0X3
phone: 774-3534  fax: 779-2203

______________________________________________________________________ 
Find, Connect, Date! http://personals.yahoo.ca

______________________________________________________
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out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


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______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:  https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden





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