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Call for papers on Connections and Potential Contributions of Planning to the Community Food System

  • Subject: [cg] Call for papers on Connections and Potential Contributions of Planning to the Community Food System
  • From: "Honigman, Adam" Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com
  • Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2002 16:55:17 -0400

Friends,

This was forwarded to me by the nice Project for Public Spaces Folks - This
would be a place where community gardeners/farmers market/food security
workers could shine if they had the time to do a little rhetorical song and
dance. 

Best wishes,

Adam Honigman

Journal of Planning Education and Research

Call for Papers

Symposium Issue on Connections and Potential Contributions of Planning
to the Community Food System

Like tomatoes growing in the back yard, planning as a discipline has
grown over the past century from the stage of seedling to early
maturation to ripeness.  The goals of planning expanded from its early
focus on efficiency and aesthetics to encompass social equity,
democratic participation, preserving public goods, excellence in the
built environment, and environmental preservation.  From its origins in
the design professions, planning widened its reach by incorporating
concepts, theories and methods from an array of disciplines familiar to
students of planning history.  These contributions added depth and
complexity to planning's application to numerous systems that give form
and shape to the built and natural environment.

Transportation, land use, housing, open space, and the economy are among
the community systems in which planners have been involved.  Health,
energy, social services, and education have also garnered attention from
planners.

One important community system, however, has received scant attention
from planning scholars and practitioners. This missing area is the food
system - the chain of activities, both in the mainstream and alternative
food systems, that goes from food production to food processing to
distribution to retailing to consumption and eventually to the disposal
of food waste. The omission is a puzzling one since planning as a
discipline marks its distinctiveness with a strong claim to be
comprehensive in scope and attentive to linkages and interrelationships
among community functional systems.  Air, water, shelter, and food are
the basic necessities of life. Among these only food has not received
the attention it warrants by the planning community.

JPER proposes to help fill this void by devoting a symposium issue to
the subject of "Connections and Potential Contributions of Planning to
the Community Food System."  The symposium is premised on two basic
contentions. The first is that the time is right to explore connections
between planning and the community food system in the light of
increasing public awareness of a plethora of food system issues that
directly and indirectly affect the quality of community life. Among the
more visible contemporary issues are diet-related illnesses affecting
community health, uncertainties about the effects of genetically
modified foods, increasing concentration of=20
corporate power in the food sector and its effects on the viability of
local and regional food systems, increasing reliance on the emergency
food system as a way of dealing with the problem of more hunger-at-risk
people in communities, and the impact that sprawl development is having
on farmland loss in metropolitan areas. The second contention is
normative: that planning and planners have important contributions to
make to improving community food systems and consequently to the quality
of community life.

JPER seeks manuscripts that could address one or more of the following
questions, with the emphasis on conveying the big picture rather than
single case studies.

--How does the food system affect in both positive and negative ways
community livability, health, sustainability and/or community building?
--How have planning and planners affected in both positive and negative
ways community food systems?
--What are the interconnections, and policy implications of these
interconnections, between the food system and the areas of housing,
economic development, environment, land use, transportation, community
development, and city revitalization?
--How can planning contribute to strengthening any of the following:
local/regional food production, greater food self-reliance, sustainable
agriculture, and alternative food system institutions like farmers
markets, community supported agriculture, community gardens, urban
agriculture, and ways of improving access of poor people to healthier,
more culturally appropriate and more nutritious foods?
-In what ways can planning theory and/or planning methods be applied to
reducing tensions and conflicts in the food system and improving
community food systems? Are there lessons to be learned from
developments in the alternative food system that can have value to
planning theory and methods?
--How can community food system planning be taught in planning schools
as a separate course and/or as an add-on to regular courses?

The editor of this special issue is Jerry Kaufman, Professor Emeritus,
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of
Wisconsin-Madison. If you have an interest in preparing a manuscript or
questions related to the special issue, contact him at
jlkaufma@facstaff.wisc.edu or 608-238-2568 (phone). Deadline for
submittals is June 15, 2003.

Send five copies of your manuscript to Jerome L. Kaufman, Dept. of Urban
and Regional Planning, 925 Bascom Mall/Old Music Hall, University of
Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706.
Symposium manuscripts will be reviewed under the normal JPER review
process.
Home  http://www.acsp.org/default.htm
News http://www.acsp.org/breaking/breaking.htmlBreaking
Executive Committee http://www.acsp.org/org/Executive
Conference Information http://www.acsp.org/events/conferences.html

This page last updated
September 20, 2002

-----Original Message-----
From: Project for Public Spaces [mailto:hfesting@pps.org]
Sent: Wednesday, September 25, 2002 11:40 AM
To: Public Spaces
Subject: (Public.Spaces) Call for papers


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Journal of Planning Education and Research

Call for Papers

Symposium Issue on Connections and Potential Contributions of Planning
to the Community Food System

Like tomatoes growing in the back yard, planning as a discipline has
grown over the past century from the stage of seedling to early
maturation to ripeness.  The goals of planning expanded from its early
focus on efficiency and aesthetics to encompass social equity,
democratic participation, preserving public goods, excellence in the
built environment, and environmental preservation.  From its origins in
the design professions, planning widened its reach by incorporating
concepts, theories and methods from an array of disciplines familiar to
students of planning history.  These contributions added depth and
complexity to planning's application to numerous systems that give form
and shape to the built and natural environment.

Transportation, land use, housing, open space, and the economy are among
the community systems in which planners have been involved.  Health,
energy, social services, and education have also garnered attention from
planners.

One important community system, however, has received scant attention
from planning scholars and practitioners. This missing area is the food
system - the chain of activities, both in the mainstream and alternative
food systems, that goes from food production to food processing to
distribution to retailing to consumption and eventually to the disposal
of food waste. The omission is a puzzling one since planning as a
discipline marks its distinctiveness with a strong claim to be
comprehensive in scope and attentive to linkages and interrelationships
among community functional systems.  Air, water, shelter, and food are
the basic necessities of life. Among these only food has not received
the attention it warrants by the planning community.

JPER proposes to help fill this void by devoting a symposium issue to
the subject of "Connections and Potential Contributions of Planning to
the Community Food System."  The symposium is premised on two basic
contentions. The first is that the time is right to explore connections
between planning and the community food system in the light of
increasing public awareness of a plethora of food system issues that
directly and indirectly affect the quality of community life. Among the
more visible contemporary issues are diet-related illnesses affecting
community health, uncertainties about the effects of genetically
modified foods, increasing concentration of=20
corporate power in the food sector and its effects on the viability of
local and regional food systems, increasing reliance on the emergency
food system as a way of dealing with the problem of more hunger-at-risk
people in communities, and the impact that sprawl development is having
on farmland loss in metropolitan areas. The second contention is
normative: that planning and planners have important contributions to
make to improving community food systems and consequently to the quality
of community life.

JPER seeks manuscripts that could address one or more of the following
questions, with the emphasis on conveying the big picture rather than
single case studies.

--How does the food system affect in both positive and negative ways
community livability, health, sustainability and/or community building?
--How have planning and planners affected in both positive and negative
ways community food systems?
--What are the interconnections, and policy implications of these
interconnections, between the food system and the areas of housing,
economic development, environment, land use, transportation, community
development, and city revitalization?
--How can planning contribute to strengthening any of the following:
local/regional food production, greater food self-reliance, sustainable
agriculture, and alternative food system institutions like farmers
markets, community supported agriculture, community gardens, urban
agriculture, and ways of improving access of poor people to healthier,
more culturally appropriate and more nutritious foods?
-In what ways can planning theory and/or planning methods be applied to
reducing tensions and conflicts in the food system and improving
community food systems? Are there lessons to be learned from
developments in the alternative food system that can have value to
planning theory and methods?
--How can community food system planning be taught in planning schools
as a separate course and/or as an add-on to regular courses?

The editor of this special issue is Jerry Kaufman, Professor Emeritus,
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of
Wisconsin-Madison. If you have an interest in preparing a manuscript or
questions related to the special issue, contact him at
jlkaufma@facstaff.wisc.edu or 608-238-2568 (phone). Deadline for
submittals is June 15, 2003.

Send five copies of your manuscript to Jerome L. Kaufman, Dept. of Urban
and Regional Planning, 925 Bascom Mall/Old Music Hall, University of
Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706.
Symposium manuscripts will be reviewed under the normal JPER review
process.
Home  http://www.acsp.org/default.htm
News http://www.acsp.org/breaking/breaking.htmlBreaking
Executive Committee http://www.acsp.org/org/Executive
Conference Information http://www.acsp.org/events/conferences.html

This page last updated
September 20, 2002

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