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Re: Re:Contaminated soil.......

  • Subject: Re: [cg] Re:[cg]Contaminated soil.......
  • From: Kris Holstrom kholstrom@gmail.com
  • Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2005 16:41:42 -0600

I'd highly recommend contacting ACI Bioremediation, the EM (effective
microorganism) folks, and even Paul Stamets at Fungi Perfecti
(fungi.com<http://fungi.com>).
Paul has done work with oyster mushrooms cleaning up toxic waste fields,
including hydrocarbons and even nastier contaminants. He teaches an annual
class on mycoremediation - using fungi to remediate land. The ACI and EM
folks use bacteria to do similar work. Both would, I think, do a clean up
job more quickly and be more easy to control than the earthworms.
Kris Holstrom
Organic Farmer

 On 9/22/05, Diane Dodge <dianefaydodge@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> Lenny and all,
>
> On Sep. 22 Lenny Librizzi wrote the following:
> It will be a fertile ground for the remediation scientists. Maybe
> earthworms might be one of the solutions. I just read an interesting
> book, The Earth Moved : On the Remarkable Achievements of Earthworms, by
> Amy Stewart and she writes about worms being used in some remediations
> including removing the odor from biosolids (dried sewage sludge. Should we
> be sending worms from our compost piles to help start the soil healing
> process?
>
> Earthworms can be a mixed blessing. Since most of those in current use in
> vermiculture(and for fish bait) are exotics and have no natural enemies in
> our native soils, they can be a problem if not contained to do their
> valuable work. Our experience in Minnesota is detailed in the following
> website:
>
> http://www.nrri.umn.edu/worms/
>
> Peace,
> Diane Dodge
>
>
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