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RE: fern spores available


Hi Robert,

I think we may have received some of the spores you brought back a couple
years ago.  We have them banked in our International Pteridophyte Bank, and
did germinate samples from them and got some sporophytes, but I would need
to sort out what we actually have growing currently.  We would be happy to
bank samples of your newest collections, as well.  We have a liquid nitrogen
storage facility for storing spores, gametophytes and shoot tips of
pteridophytes.  Its ultimate goal is endangered species preservation (we
also do seed plants and bryophytes), but with pteridophytes we are
interested in storing a wide variety of taxa, common or rare, in order to
also study the longevity of various fern spores under these conditions.  We
currently don't have much funding for this project, but we do try to take
materials when they are available. So, again, if you would like, we would be
happy to bank samples from your most current collection.

Valerie Pence

Valerie C. Pence, Ph.D.
Director of Plant Research
Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife
Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden
3400 Vine Street
Cincinnati, OH 45220



> ----------
> From: 	Robert Newman
> Reply To: 	ferns@hort.net
> Sent: 	Saturday, April 16, 2005 12:09 PM
> To: 	ferns@hort.net
> Subject: 	[ferns] fern spores available
> 
> Dear Fernetters--				3/18
> 
>    I recently came back from China.....I collected spores from a few ferns
> between 3/11/05 and 3/31/05.  Don't know how viable they are and don't
> know
> the names of most of them.  I don't have the time for doing some equitable
> distribution to various folks.  So I have the material, but I want to know
> if anyone is interested in being the distributor for them?   If so, let me
> know and I can send you the spores and others can contact you for some
> material.  I have the following:
> 
> Unknown wild fern (Asplenium sp.???)--from She Mountain in Shanghai,
> growing
> on grassy slope;  temperatures there usually get no lower than 0-5 degrees
> C
> during the winter.
> 
> 2 Unknown cultivated ferns--from West China University of Medical Sciences
> herb garden, in Chengdu, Sichuan;  don't know if these are local ferns,
> but
> I think they are.......and if they are, they're probably not too
> cold-tolerant, though the possibility exists that they may have come from
> a
> high mountain area in the province
> 
> Microsorium fortunei, cultivated--from West China University of Medical
> Sciences herb garden, in Chengdu, Sichuan;  I'm not sure, but I have the
> feeling this is not too cold hardy either;
> 
> 2 Unknown wild ferns--from the Stone Forest, in Yunnan;  sorry I don't
> have
> more info on them.....we were racing through the area when I collected
> these
> as quickly as I could (I was leading a tour and you know how time is
> crunched when you're trying to make sure you leave enough time to do the
> next activity);  these are definitely not hardy
> 
> Unknown wild fern (Asplenium sp.???)--collected from in front of the
> Golden
> Temple in Kunming, Yunnan, growing in the cracks of a stone wall;
> definitely not hardy
> 
> Unknown wild fern--collected from natural, grassy hillside area
> surrounding
> the Golden Temple in Kunming, Yunnan;   definitely not hardy
> 
> Onychium sp. (possibly O. japonicum), wild--collected from natural, grassy
> hillside area surrounding the Golden Temple in Kunming, Yunnan;
> definitely
> not hardy
> 
> By the way, did anyone manage to become successful with getting adult
> plants
> from the batch of spores I had collected and donated in March, 2002?
> Initially, a couple of people had kindly let me know they were getting
> some
> germination (and Brian Aikens was super generous in sending me some cups
> of
> planted spores!  Thanks Brian!!! I did get a plant of Camptosorus
> sibiricus
> out of it), but I never really heard anything from folks after the first
> few
> months.....did anyone manage to identify any/many of them?
> 
>   Well, that's all folks.  Robert Newman, Sherman Oaks, in San Fernando
> Valley, Southern Calif., USA
> 
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