hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: Re: ferns DIGEST V1 #166

  • Subject: Re: [ferns] Re: ferns DIGEST V1 #166
  • From: "Judith I Jones" judith@fancyfronds.com
  • Date: Sun, 1 May 2005 21:06:35 -0700

Hello Larry,
    An excellent easy to use field guide to British ferns is "The
Illustrated Field Guide to Ferns and Allied Plants of the Bristih Isles" by
Clive Jermy and Josephine Camus publiashed by the British History Museum in
1991.  There are good illustrations by Peter Edwards with good information
on comparisons between species that are similar. There are illustrations of
the stipe scale details for the Dryopteris.  BPS editor James Merryweather
also has a very easy to use field guide for begiiners called "The Fern
Guide" printed by the Field Studies Council.  For a more in depth analysis
you might want to find Christopher Page's "The Ferns of Britian and Ireland"
published by Cambridge University Press in 1982.
    Add a good 10X to 20X hands lens and you are in business!  There is even
a toy microscope made by the Intel company that plugs into your computer
with 10X, 60X, and 200X settings with which you can take photos.  They
orrignally sold for US$60 but can be found on e-Bay for less sometimes.
Judith I. Jones

 ----- Original Message -----
From: "Larry Shone" <greenlarry@ntlworld.com>
To: <ferns@hort.net>
Sent: Sunday, May 01, 2005 1:45 PM
Subject: Re: [ferns] Re: ferns DIGEST V1 #166


> I found this pic while googling for D carthusiana , and it looks very much
> like what i saw appear under the fronds of my fern last year! The frond
> edges look very similar too.
> http://www.uwgb.edu/biodiversity/herbarium/pteridophytes/drycar_sori01.jpg
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Winter, Wim de" <Wim.dewinter@wur.nl>
> To: <ferns@hort.net>
> Sent: Sunday, May 01, 2005 9:23 PM
> Subject: RE: [ferns] Re: ferns DIGEST V1 #166
>
>
> > Larry,
> >
> > Here in the Netherlands both D. carthusiana and D. dilatata frequently
pop
> up
> > in any moist plant pots in the garden. Your pictures look like a one
year
> old
> > sporeling of either.
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the
> message text UNSUBSCRIBE FERNS

---------------------------------------------------------------------
To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the
message text UNSUBSCRIBE FERNS



Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index



 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement