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Re: Re: Japanese Hepaticas


Hello Jim,
    You have native Hepatica growing in the woods near you. Same here. Not
the Japanese, of course. Probably either acutiloba or americana...the sharp
lobe or round lobe hepatica. Name have recently been changed, incidentally,
but these are the ones you will probably find them under if you do a search.
Speaking of... there is an article on one of the species on my web site
under Garden Clippin's newsletter.
    I am constantly amazed that so little attention is paid to our two
natives... no one seems to be interested in selecting and propagating the
better color forms out there. In acutiloba in my garden, I have white
blooming, several lavender to blue with white stamens and a pink or two that
are nice. There are also the European selections and species to play with
that will run about $35 or so for a fully double.... if you can find them in
a catalog.
    They simply need shade with a preferred position of east or north
exposure, good well drained gritty soil with lots of leaf mold or compost.
They respond well in the garden to mild fertilizing program... become larger
and more prolific. North hard to grow and very rewarding as the first plants
in the garden to bloom in late winter or early spring.
    Gene E. Bush
Munchkin Nursery & Gardens, llc
www.munchkinnursery.com
genebush@munchkinnursery.com
Zone 6/5  Southern Indiana

----- Original Message -----
> And do you in fact grow Hepaticas ? I'd love to try them
> and might even be willing to bleed a little money if I
> thought they'd survive my summer heat and humidity.
> -jrf
> --
> Jim Fisher
> Vienna, Virginia USA

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