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Re: Herb Suggestion/hen&chicks

Marge I have some sempervirens sitting on a plastic bag on the edge of my carport. Someone gave them to me a couple years ago & that's as far as I got with them. They get sun except for summer and early fall when the grapevines are in leaf. Then they get dappled to full shade. Despite getting run over a couple times they are multiplying. Tough little rascals. A few have crept off the concrete onto the soil. In a few more years they may make it into full sun. I really should move them, but they make me smile growing there.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Marge Talt" <mtalt@hort.net>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Monday, April 24, 2006 8:20 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] Herb Suggestion

Sue - welcome to the list!

Not really an herb nor a plant that you can just seed into bricks,
but one that would probably survive in them, which a lot of plants
will not - Sempervirens (hens and chicks).  They need very little
soil; I've seen them growing on the top of a stone wall - thrive in
sun and come in interesting colors from reds to pale greens
(foliage).  They make strange little flowers on tallish (for them)
stems.  After flowering, the mother plant dies and the babies take
over.   They do not get tall nor spread hugely laterally tho' they do
spread by the offsets (chicks).  Make a great texture.  I have them
in my sand bed and a group in a hollowed out log that looks rather
neat if I say so myself...they're kinda addictive.

Marge Talt, zone 7 Maryland
Shadyside Garden Designs

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