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RE: furry dogs/acclimation


Noreen and all....

Not debating you, but somehow it is hard to think about a big black chow
with all that fur not being hot in 95+ weather. I can't even fathom me
not being hot!:)

A friend of mine has a chow which I dog sit when he is out of town. That
dog sheds something terrible... does yours know the seasons and do the
same? Just curious.

And I do have a cocker spaniel and she was panting so bad with our heat
waves even in the a/c house. DH took the shaver to her(poor thing) and
she stopped. Seemed to appreciate having less (read no) hair, although
if she ever seen herself in the mirror.........:)

Donna

> That's very true, but same applicable principle with the fur, we were
> told.
> The same fur that acts as an insulation to the cold, works the same
for
> the
> heat.  We found this hard to believe, but several Vets, and other dog
> experts
> have verified this.
> 
> Acclimation has a lot to do with how one weathers the temperature
changes
> also.....be it animal or human.  One's blood thins in warmer climates,
and
> thickens in colder climates.  I'm no medical expert by any means, but
find
> this to
> be true.  People or animals that are acclimated to warmer climates can
> tolerate
> it more due to their body being acclimated to these temps.  Even
someone
> (dog
> or human) that is in the A/C constantly, never much outside, doesn't
> tolerate
> the heat as much as someone that is in it most of the day.
> 
> Noreen
> zone 9
> Texas Gulf Coast

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