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Re: birds


does not surprise me, cathy. they've got the same kind of big time ugliness about them.

we probably have more big birds here than most places do. on several occasions, i've had to stop my truck to allow a slow moving great blue heron to cross the road. they move so deliberately slow, placing one foot so methodically in front of the other. i've come to think of them as mechanical objects just because of how they move. but they make eye-contact with you--big amber eyes with iridescent blue in the iris. and that's why you don't run the dumb things over; they've got your number.

not too long ago, i nearly ran over a family of sandhill cranes, which was running down the middle of the road in a rain storm. after dark, i might add.

wood storks and ibis [white ones] are everywhere, scurrying about like covies of hunched over old men. on any given day you can see a golden or bald eagle circling low and waiting for a squirrel or dove to do something predictably dumb.


At 08:02 PM 2/18/03 -0600, you wrote:
Did you know the stork is a close relative of the vulture?
Cathy
On Tuesday, February 18, 2003, at 04:31 PM, Island Jim wrote:

while we're enumerating birds seen, i've got this picture i took of a wood stork standing on the very top crown branching of a norfolk island pine. what was interesting to me about it was the bird likely weighs 4 or 5 pounds and the tip-top of the tree shows no stress or sway from its being there.

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