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Re: Island Jim's clivia in FULL bloom link


Cersgarden@aol.com wrote:
Jim, when do you retrive the seed? Do you normally allow the seed head to remain on your plant? I have. Could this be the reason it is not consist with bloom period? I have one red seed on the plant or is there more than one seed per globe? What is your seeding process? If I have an orange will it always be an orange from the seed? Ceres
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
The berries can stay on the plant for 7 - 12 months, plant needs fertilizing
when seeds are growing to build up the endosperm around the seed
embryo.
Bloom comes after the plant gets several weeks of chill, in the 40s -
50s F. There can be 1 - 4 seeds in a berry, depends on how happy the
plant is when the seed grows (and perhaps how much pollen got put on
its ancestral flower). Most likely an orange flower will give seeds which
will produce more orange-flowered plants. Clivias range in color from dark
red to cream and almost white (I've never seen a pure white), so what you
get from a selfing will depend on the genetic variety built into it.
More variability would come from pollinating a dark red x a deep yellow,
as you can imagine. By 'seeding process' do you mean 'how are seeds
germinated and grown up' ? If so, I'll wait until the next round to
speak to that; it's bedtime... :-)
-jrf
--
Jim Fisher
Vienna, Virginia USA
38.9 N 77.2 W
USDA Zone 7
Max. 105 F [40 C], Min. 5 F [-15 C]

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