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Re: Winter is coming


My age of my native pecan has been estimated at 150 years old. I would imagine its roots really do go all the way to China or at least into the aquifer that supplies drinking water to this region.
zem
zone 7
West TN
----- Original Message ----- From: "Donna" <gossiper@sbcglobal.net>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Monday, November 14, 2005 7:45 PM
Subject: RE: [CHAT] Winter is coming


Since I don't know the answer.. just throwing a question out here.

Anyone know the depth of the root system of those producing and not
producing fruits?

Wondering if some are still getting sufficient water being deeper?

Donna

-----Original Message-----

I noticed my pecan crop is sparse, too; even the native one. My walnut
tree
had enough nuts to supply the third world. Go figure.

BTW, heard we might get down to low 30's tomorrow night. I still have
Aesclepias and Phlox blooming along with the typical fall bloomers.

zem
zone 7
West TN
----- Original Message -----
From: "Pam Evans" <gardenqueen@gmail.com>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Monday, November 14, 2005 6:58 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] Winter is coming


> Probably so, the pecan crop is about a third of normal here.
>
> On 11/14/05, Aplfgcnys@aol.com <Aplfgcnys@aol.com> wrote:
>>
>> We mentioned some days ago that the nut crop seems to be heavier than
>> usual this year, and speculated that the trees were responding to
drought
>> stress by producing more nuts to ensure continuation of the species.
With
>> that in mind, how do I account for the fact that the pinecone
production
>> is
>> way off. I usually pick up garbage bags full at this time of the year
to
>> use
>> in holiday decorations and as fire-starters. This year I could only
find
>> a
>> dozen or so. Fortunately I have bags of them stashed away, but wonder
>> why the poor production. Of course, this could be their way or >> reacting
>> to the drought, too. Just curious.
>> Auralie
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
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>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Pam Evans
> Kemp TX
> zone 8A
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
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> message text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT

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