hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
Gallery of Plants
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Mailing Lists
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: Woodland - Glaucidium

Thanks Gene, I'm hoping I did this in time. I did not divide the Glaucidium, just did a R&R job on it. I thought I'd read that they don't like to be disturbed, so I thought this would be the least disturbance. It was a nice hefty-sized clump, so hopefully it will rebound next year. Across the way from it in another bed of same soil, planted about the same time, is my Anemonopsis which is also suffering. I think I'll pluck it out and move it into the newly amended bed. I could put some Japanese Painted ferns in theis bed with them and maybe some Epimedium.

neIN, Zone 5
----- Original Message ----- From: "Gene Bush" <genebush@otherside.com>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Tuesday, September 05, 2006 7:09 AM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] Woodland - Glaucidium

I do not think there is a permanent answer to your dilemma. As long as the maple is alive it will want, need, and take the nutrients it needs. That means masses of roots. Now that you have your woodland gem in place once more, try doing a root prune on the tree roots about ever 2nd or 3rd year around your prize, scratch in a bit of compost. Try companions that will take the competition such a ferns that like somewhat dry shade and ephemerals that go dormant when it gets hot and dry.
Gene E. Bush
Munchkin Nursery & Gardens, llc
Zone 6/5 Southern Indiana

----- Original Message ----- From: "Kitty" <kmrsy@comcast.net>
How does one keep a woodland garden going?
I put in a lovely little raised bed surrounded by rock wall in a shady area about 20 feet from the base of a maple several years ago. The Glaucidium was to be the star. It steadily improved for about 3 yrs then started going downhill with only 3 small blooms this year. I figured, since the soil had been a bit too sandy for my liking to begin with, even though I added humus then, it probably needed more plus some nutrients. So I dug it out and I was right, too sandy, but the amount of tree roots was astounding! They were stealing every bit of good stuff that had been in that bed. I dug and cut, dug and cut, then added lots of leafmold. I tossed in alfalfa, kelp, greensand, sul-po-mag, rock phosphate, stirred it all up. Leveled it out, plunked the Glaucidium back in, but not the rest of the plants. And watered. Phew!
But how long will this last?
neIN, Zone 5
To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the
To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the

Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index

 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement