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Re: aw geez now what

  • Subject: Re: aw geez now what
  • From: "Kitty" <kmrsy@comcast.net>
  • Date: Sat, 19 Sep 2009 14:32:05 -0500

That was what I thought I might do for Orangeola, perhaps with burlap. The hosta won't sustain any serious damage to its well being from the frying leaves as it is late in the season. I just took the tree down last week.

Kitty
neIN, Zone 5
----- Original Message ----- From: "james singer" <inlandjim1@q.com>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Saturday, September 19, 2009 1:14 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] aw geez now what


In the meantime, build a frame around it and put shade cloth over it.
Then figure out what to do.

On Sep 19, 2009, at 12:03 PM, Kitty wrote:

I had to remove my Yoshino Cherry at the back of my house, west
side, as it was dying.  It's been a slow steady death from rot.  I
planted it too deeply because the B&B mechanical process had pushed
the soil up the trunk creating an artificial soil line, which in my
novitiate, I took to be the actual soil line.

The tree was one thing.  I accepted that; I took it down.  But it
had shaded my Jap Maple Orangeola, which I now worry about losing.
I also have to remove the Lamium groundcover which is scorching from
direct sun.  I can deal with all this.

The big problem though, at the moment is that I had planted a giant
blue hosta, Hosta 'Krossa Regal' in front of the tree.  It has
always been a stunning specimen with wrist-size starts shooting up
in spring.  It is frying in the sun.  I knew I had to move it, ok
but, I can't. It's been completely overgrown underground by the
cherry's tree roots.  Big suckers. Can't get a shovel into the ground.

What do I do now?

Kitty
neIN, Zone 5
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Inland Jim
Willamette Valley

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