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RE: Thanks for the datura seeds Jesse!
  • Subject: RE: Thanks for the datura seeds Jesse!
  • From: "Johnson, Cyndi D Civ USAF AFMC 95 CS/SCOSI" <cyndi.johnson@edwards.af.mil>
  • Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2010 14:20:48 -0700

I'll start them in the greenhouse in Feb then. I expect they will come
back from the roots each year; the native ones I see while hiking show
up in the same place. I have collected seeds in the past but I've been
pretty casual about it, I just scatter them in the dry garden when I get
home. It works for some of the wildflowers but I haven't had any datura
come up. 
I peeked in the greenhouse a few days ago and I think I will put a bug
bomb in there before I move plants in October. The spider webs are
atrocious, and a lot of them are black widows. Ick. 


-----Original Message-----
From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On
Behalf Of Jesse Bell
Sent: Friday, September 17, 2010 2:04 PM
To: gardenchat@hort.net
Subject: Re: [CHAT] Thanks for the datura seeds Jesse!

Oh good!  Glad you got 'em.  I start them indoors in mid-February
because they can be slow to germinate.  But once they DO...they grow
pretty fast.  I just keep them in a sunny window after that until
danger of frost is gone.  Need to rotate the pots periodically so they
don't grow crooked.  And you know what?  I don't even DO that anymore
because where I live, they just come back from the root/tuber...like
my four o'clocks do.  You're in California, right?  They should come
back from root for you.  These plants like dry heat and sun.  But if
they get too hot for long period of time, they wilt until it cools
off.  So I check them for water 2-3 times a week during the heat of
the summer.

HERE IS MY DISCLAIMER:  the self-seed.  A LOT.  So by May I'm picking
the new babies out like crazy.  I try to keep them deadheaded, but by
the end of the summer I usually get lazy and give up.  Then, what seed
pods are left on there get scattered.

I just love them.  They are beautiful and still doing well for me.

On 9/17/10, Johnson, Cyndi D Civ USAF AFMC 95 CS/SCOSI
<cyndi.johnson@edwards.af.mil> wrote:
> The seeds arrived just fine quite a while ago, we had a little chaos
> the time so I forgot to say thank you. So thank you! What's your usual
> germination method?
> Cyndi
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the

Jesse R. Bell

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