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Re: Hosta Seed Maturation

  • Subject: Re: Hosta Seed Maturation
  • From: "Bill Nash" <raffi@sympatico.ca>
  • Date: Wed, 18 Aug 2004 23:21:58 -0400

Hi John, no offence pal, and for the sake of laughter and humour, WELL, U
forgot to write *Believe it or Not*.

Personally, I don't believe for a minute, that very many hostas will show
fully ripened seeds in a single month.

*Fully Ripened hosta-seed* means: the seed will sprout plants verses unripe
seed does not sprout anything at all.  On this, my measuring stick for
collecting fully ripe hosta-seed, is to wait until pods show slits/splits
(about to split open like?).

Here's a tale, believe it or not. and regarding, the  LENGTH OF TIME TO RIPE
HOSTA SEED INDOORS?

I wanted to grow seedlings from H. longipes var. latifolia GRAND SLAM; and
which, blooms in September, in my neck of the woods.  I potted them up;
moved them into a bright window in the house, after doing self-pollination
on the florets. SELFING is the first step of line in-breeding, and going for
a more purified & uniform gorwing seed-strain, say for example..  This Grand
Slam seed was harvested at the pod-splitting-open-stage (at the end of
February)  <<almost 5 months after pollination?>>.  Showing tremendous
sprouting capacity and germination.

30-days to ripen hosta-seeds [:>(( GOOD LUCK to all!

B>)) (bill nash\Canada\Zone 3)


----- Original Message -----
From: <Jaspersail@aol.com>
To: <hosta-open@hort.net>
Sent: Wednesday, August 18, 2004 11:03 AM
Subject: Hosta Seed Maturation


> Bill Nash wrote:
>
> <<The seed-ripening-process, takes a minimum of ten weeks, after
pollination, for seed to become fully ripe, [er so I've seen  (a Doctor Ben
Zonneveld quote?)]>>
>
> I'm not sure what "fully ripe" means, but in a limited trial I conducted
last summer, my data suggests less than half that time is required for
successful germination.  At 30.5 maturation days between pollination and
harvest/sowing, seed from a H. 'Korean Snow' x H. pycnophylla cross gave me
a 43.5% germination rate.
>
> From my small sample set with H. 'Korean Snow', the earliest hypocotyl
(root) germination occurred in seeds that had developed for 24.5 days. The
earliest hypocotyl and epicotyl (growing stem) germination occurred in seeds
given 26.5 days to develop.  These results came from immediate sowing of
harvested seed with no storage or stratification.
>
> Full data and results can be found in the current issue of the
HostaScience Journal.
>
> --John
>
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