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Re: soil and roots


In a message dated 2/8/99 6:49:58 AM Central Standard Time,
zonneveld@rulbim.leidenuniv.nl writes:

<< So if you plant has been growing in a container with soilless compost 
 and you place the whole in say clay, the roots will not function nor 
 will the plant make new roots as it already has ("useless") roots. 
 Solution: If you put a plant in a container to plant out 
 later, make a mix of your potting soil with your garden 
 soil say 50 - 50. It will then much easier adapt if planted out 
 later.  >>

 I would say the roots function well as long as they are good roots- I have
seen bad roots in soils and bad roots in soilless the same for good roots.
I think some people are looking for a black or white statement that one is
better than the other.  It's not going the happen.
The artificial soils have been one of the best things to happen to cultivated
plants and us people that love plants.

If your Hosta that you are planting has a good root system it will adapt to
it's new place. You should not need to acclimate it to its' soil.

In regard to roots in soilless mixes planted into clay soils.  roots tend to
follow two rules. They grow down (Hormones) and they follow the path of least
resistance.  so when a root comes into contact with hard clay after growing in
soft soil it will develop more root in the soft soil instead of doing all the
work to get into the hard clay.
I am not saying the clay is bad soil-just that the plant has to work more to
grow in it. That is why I prefer to not plant the whole potted plants as a
plug but prefer to loosen the soil up and mix the potting soil in with the new
soil.   


Paul

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