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Re: [IGSROBIN] Brouwer - Geranium arboreum


What is going to be hard is finding the sunbirds to fertilize it.  Actually,
I checked with the park service and they don't allow collecting.  But it
seems that it is not a totally unknown commodity in the Hawaii nursery
trade.  I am onto a group called native plant propagators who may be the
source.

Growing it will be a challange.  I will probably have to use the cool room
in summer down here, but I do that for the angelica and sweet cecily anyway,
so what's one more.  Anyway, a holy quest does not have to have reason
attached to it.:)
-----Original Message-----
From: Robin Parer <geraniac@PACBELL.NET>
To: IGSROBIN@MAELSTROM.STJOHNS.EDU <IGSROBIN@MAELSTROM.STJOHNS.EDU>
Date: Thursday, February 04, 1999 8:05 PM
Subject: Re: Brouwer - Geranium arboreum


>Dear Robin:
>
>Let us all know the results of your quest.  I think you might have to
>apply to the National Park Service for a collecting permit. The plant
>seems to need cool nights, warm days, some fog, which it gets when
>Haleakala fills up through the Koolau Gap, and possibly conditions at
>high altitude, c. 6-8,000'.  It is a fascinating plant, but not
>particularly attractive from a horticultural standpoint.  The flowers
>are small, and reddish-pink, and the plant is a tall, multi-trunk shrub.
>
>Let me know if I can answer any more questions about it.
>
>Robin Parer
>Geraniaceae Nursery





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