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Re: Re: re: Help: Rhizome/stalk question
iris-photos@yahoogroups.com
  • Subject: Re: Re: re: Help: Rhizome/stalk question
  • From: "El Hutchison" <eleanore@mts.net>
  • Date: Sat, 17 Apr 2010 14:06:44 -0500

Hmm, interesting, Donald.  One year, I was told one of my transplanted iris 
clumps looked like it had scorch the next year, although we supposedly don't 
get scorch here.  I was supposed to dig it, bleach it, and replant it.  I 
never got around to it, and that clump was fine the next year.

El

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Donald Eaves" <donald@eastland.net>
To: <iris-photos@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, April 17, 2010 1:31 PM
Subject: [iris-photos] Re: re: Help: Rhizome/stalk question


> Not scorch.  That gets everything and I hope never to see it again. 
> Because
> this nearly always occurs on a rhizome that would've/should've bloomed 
> after
> it's been transplanted, I've speculated that stalk/bud formation was 
> injured
> and the rhizome then puts the remaining energy into the attached increase.
> Along the same lines I've wondered if the move caused the increase to get
> priority over bloom as the surest means of survival for the plant and suck
> too much energy from the main rhizome for it to bloom.  In either case it
> acts much like a rhizome after bloom is finished but still provides some
> food and energy to the increase.  I think it won't be a problem next year 
> on
> these transplants.
>
> Donald Eaves
> donald@eastland.net
> Texas Zone 7b, USA
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
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>
>



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