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Re: Re: TB: I. germanica
iris-photos@yahoogroups.com
  • Subject: Re: Re: TB: I. germanica
  • From: "El Hutchison" <eleanore@mts.net>
  • Date: Mon, 19 Apr 2010 11:04:20 -0500

 

Morning Sharon and all.
 
The first few AB's I received as gifts to try, in 2001.  I planted them on the sunny west side of my shed slightly under the eaves, on the south side of my property, in soil that was already sandy and gravelly; some TB's & SDB's were doing well there.  A few miles to the east, most of the area is that type of sandy soil, but only a bit of my south side has that type of soil.  The rest of my property is the "regular" Manitoba clay, so I mostly garden in raised beds or beds that have had the soil amended and raised slightly.  My 3 main raised nursery beds are in full sun.
 
The last few years have been very rainy and mostly cool, resulting in some rebloom on MDB's and SDB's that never rebloomed here before.
 
Shondo:  (F. Gadd, R. 1982) Sdlg. 13-76. AB (OGB-), 18".  Got it in 2001, planted along the shed; bloomed 2002, died over winter or early spring 2003.
 
Jacob's Well:  (M. Brizendine by J. & L. Fry, R. 1986) Sdlg. MB-14-74. AB (OGB-), 22".  Got it in 2001; planted along the shed; never bloomed, so I moved it about 10 ft further to the east, in one of my raised nursery beds, full sun, regular soil mix.  It bloomed the next year, 2007.  It died over winter or early spring 2008.
 
Prophetic Message:  (H. Nichols, R. 1978) Sdlg. 7860A. AB (1/4), 20".  Got it in 2001, planted along the shed; never bloomed.  Died 2003.
 
Prairie Thunder:  (Paul Black, R. 1990) Sdlg. 86407A. AB (OB-), 25".  Got it in 2001, planted along the shed; never bloomed.  Died 2003.
 
Walker Ross:  (Walker Ross by Chuck Chapman, R. 1996) Sdlg. SW-W13. AB (OGB-), 30".  Got it in 2001, planted along the shed; bloomed 2003.  It died over winter or early spring 2005.  Got another in 2007; planted in nursery bed; hasn't bloomed yet.
 
Elmohr:  (P. Loomis, R. ).  Got it late in 2006, planted in the nursery; never bloomed.  Dead over winter 2007.
 
Parchment Scrolls:  (Zurbrigg, R. 1959) Sdlg. 54-82-0. Eupogocyclus, 18".  Got it late in 2006, planted in the nursery; bloomed in 2007.  Dead over winter or spring 2008.
 
Bold Sentry:  (L. Peterson, R. 1983) Sdlg. LP 82-17A. AB (OGB-), 34".  Got it in 2006, planted in the nursery; bloomed in 2007.  Dead over winter or spring 2009.
 
Humohr:  (Ben Hager, R. 1980) Sdlg. AR3369Spl. AB (OGB-), 30".  Got it in 2006, planted in the nursery; bloomed in 2007.  Dead over winter or spring 2009.
 
Zwanenburg:  (Denis, 1912).  Got it in 2008, planted it directly in the lanscape with TB's. 
 
Re the ones that bloomed, then died, I wonder if I shouldn't have transplanted them right after bloom, but they seemed to be doing OK with increases.  I'm perfectly willing to try them all again, but it's hard to find a source for them, especially here in Canada.  I'll have to settle for any of these beauties that could survive here.
 
El, near Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Z3
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, April 19, 2010 9:08 AM
Subject: Re: [iris-photos] Re: TB: I. germanica

I'm curious as to which type of arilbreds you have tried.  With your collection of MDBs & SDBs, I'd have expected arilbredmedians to do quite well there.
 
Sharon McAllister
 
In a message dated 4/19/2010 7:57:52 AM Mountain Daylight Time, eleanore@mts.net writes:
Median iris, especially SDB's, are the main part of my collection.  MDB's do well here too. 
 
Historic TB's seem to do better for me than more modern TB's, although I do try to order a few new ones each year.  Last year, a friend gave me 2 historic Japanese iris.  They're greening up already, so I'm quite pleased.
 
I've managed to keep a few AB's alive long enough for them to bloom, then most have died, alas.



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