hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: HYB: Japanese Beetles
iris-photos@yahoogroups.com
  • Subject: Re: HYB: Japanese Beetles
  • From: <cholte@wi.rr.com>
  • Date: Wed, 30 Jun 2010 19:11:48 +0000

 

Hi,
Or you can use Merit on nearby fliage and they will die.
Char
---- "J. Griffin Crump" <jgcrump@cox.net> wrote:
> The Japanese beetles gorge on my roses, but leave the irises alone. Maybe you'd want to try some roses as sacrifice plants. Actually, if the beetles are a serious problem, you can modify a hand vacuum with a short piece of plastic tubing and some duct tape and remove the critters handily. -- Griff
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Jan Lauritzen
> To: iris-photos@yahoogroups.com
> Sent: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 12:54 AM
> Subject: Re: [iris-photos] HYB: Japanese Beetles
>
>
> I can't believe it but my Audubon Field Guide to Insects lays the blame on us. It says:
>
> 'The Japanese Beetle was introduced accidentally in 1916 on iris roots imported from Japan and has been a major pest for years. Its numbers have been reduced by the controlled use of parasitic tachnid flies and tiphiid wasps that prey on beetle larvae.'
>
> Jan in Chatsworth
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> From: AISSlides <gbyp123@yahoo.com>
> To: iris-photos@yahoogroups.com
> Sent: Tue, June 29, 2010 9:16:36 PM
> Subject: Re: [iris-photos] HYB: Come What May X Lunar Whitewash
>
>
> When I lived in Fresno they attached every pastel iris I had.
>
> Janet, CA
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> From: Jan Lauritzen <janicelauritzen@yahoo.com>
> To: iris-photos@yahoogroups.com
> Sent: Tue, June 29, 2010 9:04:44 PM
> Subject: Re: [iris-photos] HYB: Come What May X Lunar Whitewash
>
>
> Have anyone else noticed that the Japanese Beetles seem to go for the whites - even on an amoena or reverse amoena - and the very pale yellows? I never had them here in Southern California before last year. Here is a picture of them in my garden on Two Below Zero.
>
>
> Jan in Chatsworth
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> From: "MryL1@msn.com" <MryL1@msn.com>
> To: iris-photos <iris-photos@yahoogroups.com>
> Sent: Tue, June 29, 2010 8:10:41 PM
> Subject: [iris-photos] HYB: Come What May X Lunar Whitewash
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Well, rats! My old Kodak just can't handle white very well. By the
> time I got home from work, I had to take half a dozen Japanese beetles
> off to get this shot. This summer maiden is 39.5 inches with nine buds
> today. Three in the lowest socket, so I expect more in a few days.
> The leaf on this stalk has no branch, so it's a looong way up to the
> branching in the photo. Hopefully just another example of maiden
> misbehaving and not the influence of LW.
>
> Mary Lou, near Indianapolis, Z5
>
>
>
>
>



Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index



 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement