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Re: Re: [More on] TB: Germanica?

  • Subject: Re: [iris-photos] Re: [More on] TB: Germanica?
  • From: "David Ferguson" <manzano57@msn.com>
  • Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2004 06:17:23 -0700
  • Seal-send-time: Wed, 17 Mar 2004 06:17:26 -0700

Right now, this is as close as I can get to posting photos.  Here are some links to some Iris that have the "look" of the original tetraploid species, several are perhaps "pure" for wild tet. TB genes, but not all of them.  These are at the HIPS web site:
 
Blue Rhythm (This is several generations away from wild species in a line that appears to be selected for blue color; however, a quick check through ancestry shows a lot of influence from the TB tetraploid "species" even in the documented parts.)
 
another, perhaps a few generations closer to "wild" is 'Missouri'
 
Alcazar
 
Amas
 
Ambassadeur
 
Buechley Giant
 
Gudrun
 
I. trojana
 
Lent. A. Williamson
 
Magnifica
 
Melchior
 
Morocco Rose
 
If you look at the Shadowood web site, Laurie has an unknown #52 that really looks like one of these too.
 
There are quite a number of others for which I haven't been able to find photos yet.
 
 
Enjoy,
 
Dave
 
Another "species" for which I couldn't find much information, which seems to be a tetraploid TB is I. skamnilii.

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