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Re: IRIS DEVELOPMENT: WHY DONT WE USE OTHER PLANT POLLEN FOR RA...

  • Subject: [PHOTO] Re: [iris-photos] IRIS DEVELOPMENT: WHY DONT WE USE OTHER PLANT POLLEN FOR RA...
  • From: cseggen1@aol.com
  • Date: Mon, 15 May 2006 12:42:56 EDT

In a message dated 5/15/2006 5:29:17 AM Central Daylight Time, petalpusherpaul@aol.com writes:
Beautifully said....I originally noted the pollen because the flower looked dusty.  I can't clean it off, but yet the perfectionist in me can't waist the time digitally spotting each image to clean it up either.  The 'strange brew' referred to was the genetic mix within the flower that allowed this effect to manifest.....I'm grateful to James for a wonderful and clear resolution to the debate.....Here's another image of the flower that I originally wrote about......Paul Hill
 
Paul, this is an even better view of it.  Hope it procreates/clones itself! 
 
 
Connie Eggen
Warsaw, MO zone 5+


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