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Re: Re: Wildflower ID/companion plant - not!
  • Subject: Re: Re: Wildflower ID/companion plant - not!
  • From: Betty Wilkerson <Autmirislvr@aol.com>
  • Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2010 07:58:20 -0400 (EDT)


This would be the telling feature then.  Something I didn't remember. 
<<Unopened flower buds of coreopsis are boxy looking, very distinctive.>>
I grew cosmos long before I grew the coreopsis and wondered about it being cosmos;however, the coreopsis is a perennial while the cosmos is an annual that reseeds itself.  I thought it more likely that the coreopsis (tick weed) would be added to a wildflower mix.  A guess really.  In my memory the double coreopsis has a more dense foliage, but I also tried a "paint" variety which is single and it had more sparse foliage. 
I think they're both pretty. 
Betty W.
KY Zone 6

-----Original Message-----
From: Linda Mann <lmann@lock-net.com>
To: iris-photos <iris-photos@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Mon, Nov 1, 2010 3:47 am
Subject: [iris-photos] Re: Wildflower ID/companion plant - not!

Unopened flower buds of coreopsis are boxy looking, very distinctive.

Flowers of yellow cosmos and coreopsis are hard for me to tell apart
from a photo.

I thought cosmos were going to be a great iris companion plant, drought
tolerant, airy foliage, self sowing. Several generations later, self
sowing in the iris patch, they grow up to 6 ft tall with dense foliage.
Beautiful in bloom, but too enthusiastic! smothering irises. First
generation was <3 ft.

Linda Mann east TN USA zone 7

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