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Re: Dead Horse Arum

  • Subject: Re: Dead Horse Arum
  • From: Piabinha@aol.com
  • Date: Fri, 27 Apr 2001 22:37:26 -0500 (CDT)

as with some stapeliads, the putative offensive smell is only discernible if you really stick your nose ot the flower.  last year my Edithcolea grandis bloomed but unless your nose was inside the flower, you couldn't really smell that wonderful rotting meat fragrance.

In a message dated Fri, 27 Apr 2001 10:57:36 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Paul Tyerman <tyerman@dynamite.com.au> writes:

<< I had Helicodicerus flower for me last year.  Absolutely stunning.  It is
interesting though that mine barely smelt at all.  I was nicely surprised
given what we have to put up with from my various clumps of Dracunculus
vulgaris each year.

It is interesting that you rate it as worst smell, and yet we struggled to
find a smell at all (could JUSt detect it when sticking nose virtually into
the flower.

Why would mine have not ponged at all? >>

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