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Re: [Aroid-l] Off topic: Lycopodium in arrangements question

  • Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Off topic: Lycopodium in arrangements question
  • From: "Alan Galloway" alan_galloway@ncsu.edu
  • Date: Wed, 5 Apr 2006 15:46:55 -0400


I've seen Lycopodium used in cut flower arrangements in some of the
Asian hotels, usually in combination with red roses.

Here in the SE U.S. there is a Lycopodium species that grows in the coastal
swamps, usually in the same habitat as venus flytraps and pitcher plants.  I'm
not positive, but I believe it is Lycopodium alopecuroides, commonly called
Foxtail clubmoss.

I took a quick look in one of my fern books last night and it said Lycopodium
is best propagated by spores.


Undaunted by the silence on my "Philodendron barryii" question, I have another.
It's not an aroid question, but I'll bet several people on this list know the

I saw some cut flower arrangements this past weekend which contained stems of a
filler I initially thought was a remarkably large and stiff selaginella. My
wife - who had the sense to broaden her search beyond selaginellas when those
queries turned up nothing - found some hits on lycopodium, and from those it
appears that lycopodium stems are now a common filler in the cut flower trade.

First question: what species is this? I was told the arrangements were
mail-ordered from "somewhere in Hawaii", and a number of firms there offer
lycopodium stems as a filler. I have an idea, but since I'm sure you guys know
for certain, I'll just ask.

Second question: I gather lycopodiums can be rooted from cuttings, but that
it's not all that easy. Does anyone have any hints? Because I'm going to try,
of course.

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