RE: Persisting Taro, Bok


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From: 	aroid-l@mobot.org on behalf of Richard Mansell (BIO)
Sent: 	Tuesday, April 15, 1997 10:48 PM
To: 	Julius Boos
Subject: 	Re: Persisting Taro, Bok



< Greetings, locally we have a grower that produces 10,000 Colocasia tubers
<each season.  The tubers are dug in November and left to dry for 2 months
<before being boxed for shipment to the international bulb (tuber)
<companies.  This plant will live in the tuber state for months and if
<large, I would guess a year or more.  They dry very slowly and although
<they tend to start new growth in warm weather, the development is slow.  I
<have some I got in November and they look no different now than when I
<picked them from the field.  

<Dick

--
<Richard L. Mansell                             Phone: H(813) 961-7072
<Biology Department, LIF 136                           W(813) 974-1588
<University of South Florida                    Fax:    (813) 974-1614    
<Tampa, FL 33620 
                                              
<Home: 13508 Little Lake Place, Tampa, FL 33613-4134
 
  < E-mail-   mansell@chuma.cas.usf.edu        
   <WWW -     http://www.cas.usf.edu/~mansell/mansell.html 
 
Dear Dick,
               Sounds like they are cultivating the "edoes" variety of 
Colocasia, not the "dasheen" type.  Edoes develop as smaller cormlets or 
tubers off the center "mother" rhizome, while dasheen develops as a main 
central tuber that produces few or no small tubers, and are larger.  They are 
quite different in taste and texture also.  Edoes "keep" for a longer period 
after harvest than dasheen, and are easier to grow "dry",as they do not 
require flooded conditions..  Perhaps you could enquire if they produce any 
dasheen, as I remember reading that a dasheen cultivar that the Americans 
called "Trinidad" [probably our "white dasheen"] was grown commercially in the 
U.S., I believe in the Carolinas. 
  By the way, I`ll soon be publishing in this forum a receipe for edoes, 
passed on to me from my maternal Grandmother on the Island of Barbados, W.I., 
called "`Bajan slipery-dips in devil sauce" that we served in my home on a 
regular basis.   It complements any fish meal.  Meanwhile, try them in place 
of potatoes in any soup, I think you`ll like them! 
                                                                 Cheers,   J.  
                    
                                                           [ju-bo@msn.com]



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