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Re: [Aroid-l] Hybrids/orchids/Don

  • Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Hybrids/orchids/Don
  • From: bonaventure@optonline.net
  • Date: Mon, 26 Feb 2007 20:34:52 +0000 (GMT)
  • Content-language: en
  • Priority: normal

Re orchids - no moist camel hair brush. A toothpick does the job, transferring the pollen as one mass, the pollinium..
Bonaventure

----- Original Message -----
From: Julius Boos
Date: Sunday, February 25, 2007 6:54 pm
Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Hybrids/orchids/Don
To: aroid-l@gizmoworks.com

>
> >From :
> Reply-To : Discussion of aroids
> Sent : Saturday, February 24, 2007 7:45 PM
> To : aroid-l@gizmoworks.com (Discussion of aroids)
> Subject : Re: [Aroid-l] Hybrids?
>
>
>
> Don,
>
> Orchids present a special case. It is thought that IN THE WILD
> they are
> generally kept as 'pure species' by the different odors they
> produce, and
> the different times of day/night that these odors are produced,
> this
> attracts different pollinators which are thought to only be
> attracted to
> THAT particular species/genus of orchid. When man puts his
> 'grubby little
> fingers' into the picture wielding a moist camel hair brush, it
> circumvents
> nature, and hybrids, which VERY rarely MIGHT be seen in nature,
> are
> produced.
>
> Good Growing
>
> Julius
>
> >>Julius thanks for the clarification (the ass and the horse) ==
> a mule,
> however I also think of orchids where 4 distinct species will
> cross and
> produce viable seed.
> Cattleya+laliea+brassovola+epidendrumDon Hudson
>
>
> Have A Great Day !!! TakeCare...
>
> _
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Aroid-l mailing list
> Aroid-l@gizmoworks.com
> http://www.gizmoworks.com/mailman/listinfo/aroid-l
>
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