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Dumbcane in Cross Section

  • Subject: Dumbcane in Cross Section
  • From: Ted.Held@hstna.com
  • Date: Mon, 23 Jul 2001 15:14:10 -0500 (CDT)


Well, my putative D. seguine has a very ordinary looking cross section. I
made my cut perpendicular to the stem, thus cutting across any conductive
structures. There is a brownish "bark" part at the outer perimeter,
containing what look like depleted cells. The interior looks like a green
honeycomb with rather uniform, turgid cells containing what looks like
uninteresting liquid. The sap has a brownish-white latex appearance, the
brown becoming darker on exposure to air. I made a 2% infusion of
freshly-crushed stem in deionized water. It has a pH of 6.1, for those who
might be interested. I saw no signs of raphides in the microtomed section
or in the fresh, wet sap.

Like before, I will gladly send photomicrographs (with micron bars for
sizing of structures in the pictures) to anyone contacting me directly. I
have one of the outer section of the microtomed stem that is nicely
colorful, and one of some of the wet sap wetting the microscope slide. The
first one is the more interesting since it shows both types of cells quite
well.

ted.held@hstna.com





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